Peggy Seeger and crossovers

Forgive the self-indulgence, but I have to share a coincidence. Bear with me - there is more than one PP-related point to it. I was walking yesterday on Hampstead Heath, listening as I occasionally do to Michael Berkeley's programme of musical interviews, Private Passions. The guest this week was Peggy Seeger, the folk singer. At 86 she was sharp, full of humour and very open. Towards the end of the programme, Peggy talked about one of her most famous songs, "I want to be an engineer". She described its origins: she was doing the accounts when her partner Ewen MacColl came down and said they needed a song, urgently; Peggy…
Read More

Chinese women: linking PP and TH

"China's female professionals are fighting the world's lowest retirement age." The item in the FT caught my attention because it links my past and my present: the struggle for greater recognition for women's competences, across the full life course (Paula Principle, book done); and the changing definitions of where people stand in that life course (Triple Helix, book still very much to be done). I couldn't find trends on Chinese women's educational achievement in the OECD's comparative statistics. Gathering these will be a huge task. But I'd be willing to bet that in the metropolitan regions at least young Chinese women over outdoing their male contemporaries. However older women will…
Read More

GPG reporting internationally

Requiring companies to report on their gender pay gaps is becoming more common around the world. A 6-country analysis from the Global Institute for Women's Leadership at King's College London draws on 80 interviews with people well placed to judge what impact this is having, and what the main challenges are. The countries' scorecards are below. The report's conclusions are to some extent predictable (though none the less valid for all that): a need for greater transparency and accountability; stronger sanctions; measurable targets; and integration of policies to deal with GPGs at all levels. But the insights from the launch's widely experienced panel discussion were particularly valuable. More than one…
Read More

The Known World

"A man does not learn very well, Mr Robbins. Women, yes, because they are used to bending with whatever wind comes along. A woman, no matter what the age, is always learning, always becoming. But a man, if you will pardon me, stops learning at fourteen or so. He shuts it all down, Mr Robbins. A log is capable of learning more than a man. To teach a man would be a battle, a war, and I would lose." This is Fern Elston speaking, in Edward P. Jones' wonderfully original and informative novel about slavery, The Known World. Fern Elston is a free black woman, a teacher, and she is…
Read More

WEF report: double depression

The latest World Economic Forum report on the Gender Pay Gap is depressing for two reasons. I applaud the WEF for its attention to the issue, but I find its 'solution' simplistic. First, it shows that worldwide the cause of greater equality has been put into reverse. The latest trends means that it will take "a staggering 257 years to close the gap on economic participation for women – compared to 202 years in last year’s report." We know that the pandemic has added to women's unpaid work burdens; caused many women to drop out of the employment; and hit the occupations in which women tend to work harder than…
Read More

AI and Gender

We're starting to learn more about the biases buried deep within our data. Many of the knowledge bases that we have long thought of as objective turn out to be systematically skewed. I first became aware of this reading Mark Glezerman's Gender Medicine, which brought to light the way medical research uses evidence derived from research on men only. This can have literally fatal consequences, for example in the way women's strokes fail to be recognised and treated. Glezerman's book was followed by the better-known Invisible Women by Caroline Criado-Perez. Awareness of this has been boosted recently because of the way AI systems use existing data to bake in biases.…
Read More

GPG: the effects of age – a different ‘scarring’

I've just been through a major desk refurb. This was an actual physical reconstruction (courtesy of my brother-in-law's carpentering talents) and not just a clearing out of papers, but I did come across a few interesting items that had slipped out of sight. These included a press cutting from a few months ago on the gender pay gap for the over 50s. The piece cited a report from an organisation called Rest Less. I couldn't find the report on their website but the headline showed a median salary gap of 23% for full timers over 50, and 25% for those over 60. This is large in itself, but of course…
Read More

A sad consequence of the PP

South Korea is probably the most extreme example of the Paula Principle. The undervaluing of Korean women's competences is having tragic consequences. A very simple three-step process shows this, illustrated by the OECD charts below. First, Koreans have made quite extraordinary educational progress, if you compare the educational levels of 55-64 year olds with those two generations later. Secondly, it is Korean women who have been propelling this stellar rise up the educational tables. From very low levels a generation ago, 59% of young Korean women now enter Bachelor programmes - a lead of 6% over their male counterparts. The graduation rates are unfortunately missing from current OECD data, but…
Read More

Later life GPG, and specialisation

Well, it's a new year, and that has to be good news. If not, we're in trouble....No, it's time to be positive. Or at least persistent. I saw a recent news item which referred to research on gender pay differences by an organisation called Rest Less. The organisation's title sounds rather forbidding - no slacking here - but it offers advice and encouragement across a range of areas, including work, health and lifestyle. One section of the website that naturally appealed to me was on learning; it offers a good range of opportunities, for instance on courses leading to work in the field of health.. I could't find details of…
Read More

GPG reporting – what UK needs to do

The Fawcett Society and the Kings' College Global Institute for Women's Leadership have just published an interesting report comparing the UK to nine other countries in the practice of gender pay gap reporting. My impression has been that the legislation requiring companies with over 250 employees to produce a range of data on GPG was a big step forwards. I still think that; for one thing it's enabled people like ShareAction's AGM activists to ask probing questions of corporate behaviour - and their intentions for the future. Pushing the Paula Principle I've been able to put questions about career trajectories, as well as just pay gaps. There are some quite…
Read More

Peggy Seeger and crossovers

Forgive the self-indulgence, but I have to share a coincidence. Bear with me - there is more than one PP-related point to it. I was walking yesterday on Hampstead Heath, listening as I occasionally do to Michael Berkeley's programme of musical interviews, Private Passions. The guest this week was Peggy Seeger, the folk singer. At 86 she was sharp, full of humour and very open. Towards the end of the programme, Peggy talked about one of her most famous songs, "I want to be an engineer". She described its origins: she was doing the accounts when her partner Ewen MacColl came down and said they needed a song, urgently; Peggy…
Read More

Chinese women: linking PP and TH

"China's female professionals are fighting the world's lowest retirement age." The item in the FT caught my attention because it links my past and my present: the struggle for greater recognition for women's competences, across the full life course (Paula Principle, book done); and the changing definitions of where people stand in that life course (Triple Helix, book still very much to be done). I couldn't find trends on Chinese women's educational achievement in the OECD's comparative statistics. Gathering these will be a huge task. But I'd be willing to bet that in the metropolitan regions at least young Chinese women over outdoing their male contemporaries. However older women will…
Read More

GPG reporting internationally

Requiring companies to report on their gender pay gaps is becoming more common around the world. A 6-country analysis from the Global Institute for Women's Leadership at King's College London draws on 80 interviews with people well placed to judge what impact this is having, and what the main challenges are. The countries' scorecards are below. The report's conclusions are to some extent predictable (though none the less valid for all that): a need for greater transparency and accountability; stronger sanctions; measurable targets; and integration of policies to deal with GPGs at all levels. But the insights from the launch's widely experienced panel discussion were particularly valuable. More than one…
Read More

The Known World

"A man does not learn very well, Mr Robbins. Women, yes, because they are used to bending with whatever wind comes along. A woman, no matter what the age, is always learning, always becoming. But a man, if you will pardon me, stops learning at fourteen or so. He shuts it all down, Mr Robbins. A log is capable of learning more than a man. To teach a man would be a battle, a war, and I would lose." This is Fern Elston speaking, in Edward P. Jones' wonderfully original and informative novel about slavery, The Known World. Fern Elston is a free black woman, a teacher, and she is…
Read More

WEF report: double depression

The latest World Economic Forum report on the Gender Pay Gap is depressing for two reasons. I applaud the WEF for its attention to the issue, but I find its 'solution' simplistic. First, it shows that worldwide the cause of greater equality has been put into reverse. The latest trends means that it will take "a staggering 257 years to close the gap on economic participation for women – compared to 202 years in last year’s report." We know that the pandemic has added to women's unpaid work burdens; caused many women to drop out of the employment; and hit the occupations in which women tend to work harder than…
Read More

AI and Gender

We're starting to learn more about the biases buried deep within our data. Many of the knowledge bases that we have long thought of as objective turn out to be systematically skewed. I first became aware of this reading Mark Glezerman's Gender Medicine, which brought to light the way medical research uses evidence derived from research on men only. This can have literally fatal consequences, for example in the way women's strokes fail to be recognised and treated. Glezerman's book was followed by the better-known Invisible Women by Caroline Criado-Perez. Awareness of this has been boosted recently because of the way AI systems use existing data to bake in biases.…
Read More

GPG: the effects of age – a different ‘scarring’

I've just been through a major desk refurb. This was an actual physical reconstruction (courtesy of my brother-in-law's carpentering talents) and not just a clearing out of papers, but I did come across a few interesting items that had slipped out of sight. These included a press cutting from a few months ago on the gender pay gap for the over 50s. The piece cited a report from an organisation called Rest Less. I couldn't find the report on their website but the headline showed a median salary gap of 23% for full timers over 50, and 25% for those over 60. This is large in itself, but of course…
Read More

A sad consequence of the PP

South Korea is probably the most extreme example of the Paula Principle. The undervaluing of Korean women's competences is having tragic consequences. A very simple three-step process shows this, illustrated by the OECD charts below. First, Koreans have made quite extraordinary educational progress, if you compare the educational levels of 55-64 year olds with those two generations later. Secondly, it is Korean women who have been propelling this stellar rise up the educational tables. From very low levels a generation ago, 59% of young Korean women now enter Bachelor programmes - a lead of 6% over their male counterparts. The graduation rates are unfortunately missing from current OECD data, but…
Read More

Later life GPG, and specialisation

Well, it's a new year, and that has to be good news. If not, we're in trouble....No, it's time to be positive. Or at least persistent. I saw a recent news item which referred to research on gender pay differences by an organisation called Rest Less. The organisation's title sounds rather forbidding - no slacking here - but it offers advice and encouragement across a range of areas, including work, health and lifestyle. One section of the website that naturally appealed to me was on learning; it offers a good range of opportunities, for instance on courses leading to work in the field of health.. I could't find details of…
Read More

GPG reporting – what UK needs to do

The Fawcett Society and the Kings' College Global Institute for Women's Leadership have just published an interesting report comparing the UK to nine other countries in the practice of gender pay gap reporting. My impression has been that the legislation requiring companies with over 250 employees to produce a range of data on GPG was a big step forwards. I still think that; for one thing it's enabled people like ShareAction's AGM activists to ask probing questions of corporate behaviour - and their intentions for the future. Pushing the Paula Principle I've been able to put questions about career trajectories, as well as just pay gaps. There are some quite…
Read More

Peggy Seeger and crossovers

Forgive the self-indulgence, but I have to share a coincidence. Bear with me - there is more than one PP-related point to it. I was walking yesterday on Hampstead Heath, listening as I occasionally do to Michael Berkeley's programme of musical interviews, Private Passions. The guest this week was Peggy Seeger, the folk singer. At 86 she was sharp, full of humour and very open. Towards the end of the programme, Peggy talked about one of her most famous songs, "I want to be an engineer". She described its origins: she was doing the accounts when her partner Ewen MacColl came down and said they needed a song, urgently; Peggy…
Read More

Chinese women: linking PP and TH

"China's female professionals are fighting the world's lowest retirement age." The item in the FT caught my attention because it links my past and my present: the struggle for greater recognition for women's competences, across the full life course (Paula Principle, book done); and the changing definitions of where people stand in that life course (Triple Helix, book still very much to be done). I couldn't find trends on Chinese women's educational achievement in the OECD's comparative statistics. Gathering these will be a huge task. But I'd be willing to bet that in the metropolitan regions at least young Chinese women over outdoing their male contemporaries. However older women will…
Read More

GPG reporting internationally

Requiring companies to report on their gender pay gaps is becoming more common around the world. A 6-country analysis from the Global Institute for Women's Leadership at King's College London draws on 80 interviews with people well placed to judge what impact this is having, and what the main challenges are. The countries' scorecards are below. The report's conclusions are to some extent predictable (though none the less valid for all that): a need for greater transparency and accountability; stronger sanctions; measurable targets; and integration of policies to deal with GPGs at all levels. But the insights from the launch's widely experienced panel discussion were particularly valuable. More than one…
Read More

The Known World

"A man does not learn very well, Mr Robbins. Women, yes, because they are used to bending with whatever wind comes along. A woman, no matter what the age, is always learning, always becoming. But a man, if you will pardon me, stops learning at fourteen or so. He shuts it all down, Mr Robbins. A log is capable of learning more than a man. To teach a man would be a battle, a war, and I would lose." This is Fern Elston speaking, in Edward P. Jones' wonderfully original and informative novel about slavery, The Known World. Fern Elston is a free black woman, a teacher, and she is…
Read More

WEF report: double depression

The latest World Economic Forum report on the Gender Pay Gap is depressing for two reasons. I applaud the WEF for its attention to the issue, but I find its 'solution' simplistic. First, it shows that worldwide the cause of greater equality has been put into reverse. The latest trends means that it will take "a staggering 257 years to close the gap on economic participation for women – compared to 202 years in last year’s report." We know that the pandemic has added to women's unpaid work burdens; caused many women to drop out of the employment; and hit the occupations in which women tend to work harder than…
Read More

AI and Gender

We're starting to learn more about the biases buried deep within our data. Many of the knowledge bases that we have long thought of as objective turn out to be systematically skewed. I first became aware of this reading Mark Glezerman's Gender Medicine, which brought to light the way medical research uses evidence derived from research on men only. This can have literally fatal consequences, for example in the way women's strokes fail to be recognised and treated. Glezerman's book was followed by the better-known Invisible Women by Caroline Criado-Perez. Awareness of this has been boosted recently because of the way AI systems use existing data to bake in biases.…
Read More

GPG: the effects of age – a different ‘scarring’

I've just been through a major desk refurb. This was an actual physical reconstruction (courtesy of my brother-in-law's carpentering talents) and not just a clearing out of papers, but I did come across a few interesting items that had slipped out of sight. These included a press cutting from a few months ago on the gender pay gap for the over 50s. The piece cited a report from an organisation called Rest Less. I couldn't find the report on their website but the headline showed a median salary gap of 23% for full timers over 50, and 25% for those over 60. This is large in itself, but of course…
Read More

A sad consequence of the PP

South Korea is probably the most extreme example of the Paula Principle. The undervaluing of Korean women's competences is having tragic consequences. A very simple three-step process shows this, illustrated by the OECD charts below. First, Koreans have made quite extraordinary educational progress, if you compare the educational levels of 55-64 year olds with those two generations later. Secondly, it is Korean women who have been propelling this stellar rise up the educational tables. From very low levels a generation ago, 59% of young Korean women now enter Bachelor programmes - a lead of 6% over their male counterparts. The graduation rates are unfortunately missing from current OECD data, but…
Read More

Later life GPG, and specialisation

Well, it's a new year, and that has to be good news. If not, we're in trouble....No, it's time to be positive. Or at least persistent. I saw a recent news item which referred to research on gender pay differences by an organisation called Rest Less. The organisation's title sounds rather forbidding - no slacking here - but it offers advice and encouragement across a range of areas, including work, health and lifestyle. One section of the website that naturally appealed to me was on learning; it offers a good range of opportunities, for instance on courses leading to work in the field of health.. I could't find details of…
Read More

GPG reporting – what UK needs to do

The Fawcett Society and the Kings' College Global Institute for Women's Leadership have just published an interesting report comparing the UK to nine other countries in the practice of gender pay gap reporting. My impression has been that the legislation requiring companies with over 250 employees to produce a range of data on GPG was a big step forwards. I still think that; for one thing it's enabled people like ShareAction's AGM activists to ask probing questions of corporate behaviour - and their intentions for the future. Pushing the Paula Principle I've been able to put questions about career trajectories, as well as just pay gaps. There are some quite…
Read More

Peggy Seeger and crossovers

Forgive the self-indulgence, but I have to share a coincidence. Bear with me - there is more than one PP-related point to it. I was walking yesterday on Hampstead Heath, listening as I occasionally do to Michael Berkeley's programme of musical interviews, Private Passions. The guest this week was Peggy Seeger, the folk singer. At 86 she was sharp, full of humour and very open. Towards the end of the programme, Peggy talked about one of her most famous songs, "I want to be an engineer". She described its origins: she was doing the accounts when her partner Ewen MacColl came down and said they needed a song, urgently; Peggy…
Read More

Chinese women: linking PP and TH

"China's female professionals are fighting the world's lowest retirement age." The item in the FT caught my attention because it links my past and my present: the struggle for greater recognition for women's competences, across the full life course (Paula Principle, book done); and the changing definitions of where people stand in that life course (Triple Helix, book still very much to be done). I couldn't find trends on Chinese women's educational achievement in the OECD's comparative statistics. Gathering these will be a huge task. But I'd be willing to bet that in the metropolitan regions at least young Chinese women over outdoing their male contemporaries. However older women will…
Read More

GPG reporting internationally

Requiring companies to report on their gender pay gaps is becoming more common around the world. A 6-country analysis from the Global Institute for Women's Leadership at King's College London draws on 80 interviews with people well placed to judge what impact this is having, and what the main challenges are. The countries' scorecards are below. The report's conclusions are to some extent predictable (though none the less valid for all that): a need for greater transparency and accountability; stronger sanctions; measurable targets; and integration of policies to deal with GPGs at all levels. But the insights from the launch's widely experienced panel discussion were particularly valuable. More than one…
Read More

The Known World

"A man does not learn very well, Mr Robbins. Women, yes, because they are used to bending with whatever wind comes along. A woman, no matter what the age, is always learning, always becoming. But a man, if you will pardon me, stops learning at fourteen or so. He shuts it all down, Mr Robbins. A log is capable of learning more than a man. To teach a man would be a battle, a war, and I would lose." This is Fern Elston speaking, in Edward P. Jones' wonderfully original and informative novel about slavery, The Known World. Fern Elston is a free black woman, a teacher, and she is…
Read More

WEF report: double depression

The latest World Economic Forum report on the Gender Pay Gap is depressing for two reasons. I applaud the WEF for its attention to the issue, but I find its 'solution' simplistic. First, it shows that worldwide the cause of greater equality has been put into reverse. The latest trends means that it will take "a staggering 257 years to close the gap on economic participation for women – compared to 202 years in last year’s report." We know that the pandemic has added to women's unpaid work burdens; caused many women to drop out of the employment; and hit the occupations in which women tend to work harder than…
Read More

AI and Gender

We're starting to learn more about the biases buried deep within our data. Many of the knowledge bases that we have long thought of as objective turn out to be systematically skewed. I first became aware of this reading Mark Glezerman's Gender Medicine, which brought to light the way medical research uses evidence derived from research on men only. This can have literally fatal consequences, for example in the way women's strokes fail to be recognised and treated. Glezerman's book was followed by the better-known Invisible Women by Caroline Criado-Perez. Awareness of this has been boosted recently because of the way AI systems use existing data to bake in biases.…
Read More

GPG: the effects of age – a different ‘scarring’

I've just been through a major desk refurb. This was an actual physical reconstruction (courtesy of my brother-in-law's carpentering talents) and not just a clearing out of papers, but I did come across a few interesting items that had slipped out of sight. These included a press cutting from a few months ago on the gender pay gap for the over 50s. The piece cited a report from an organisation called Rest Less. I couldn't find the report on their website but the headline showed a median salary gap of 23% for full timers over 50, and 25% for those over 60. This is large in itself, but of course…
Read More

A sad consequence of the PP

South Korea is probably the most extreme example of the Paula Principle. The undervaluing of Korean women's competences is having tragic consequences. A very simple three-step process shows this, illustrated by the OECD charts below. First, Koreans have made quite extraordinary educational progress, if you compare the educational levels of 55-64 year olds with those two generations later. Secondly, it is Korean women who have been propelling this stellar rise up the educational tables. From very low levels a generation ago, 59% of young Korean women now enter Bachelor programmes - a lead of 6% over their male counterparts. The graduation rates are unfortunately missing from current OECD data, but…
Read More

Later life GPG, and specialisation

Well, it's a new year, and that has to be good news. If not, we're in trouble....No, it's time to be positive. Or at least persistent. I saw a recent news item which referred to research on gender pay differences by an organisation called Rest Less. The organisation's title sounds rather forbidding - no slacking here - but it offers advice and encouragement across a range of areas, including work, health and lifestyle. One section of the website that naturally appealed to me was on learning; it offers a good range of opportunities, for instance on courses leading to work in the field of health.. I could't find details of…
Read More

GPG reporting – what UK needs to do

The Fawcett Society and the Kings' College Global Institute for Women's Leadership have just published an interesting report comparing the UK to nine other countries in the practice of gender pay gap reporting. My impression has been that the legislation requiring companies with over 250 employees to produce a range of data on GPG was a big step forwards. I still think that; for one thing it's enabled people like ShareAction's AGM activists to ask probing questions of corporate behaviour - and their intentions for the future. Pushing the Paula Principle I've been able to put questions about career trajectories, as well as just pay gaps. There are some quite…
Read More

Peggy Seeger and crossovers

Forgive the self-indulgence, but I have to share a coincidence. Bear with me - there is more than one PP-related point to it. I was walking yesterday on Hampstead Heath, listening as I occasionally do to Michael Berkeley's programme of musical interviews, Private Passions. The guest this week was Peggy Seeger, the folk singer. At 86 she was sharp, full of humour and very open. Towards the end of the programme, Peggy talked about one of her most famous songs, "I want to be an engineer". She described its origins: she was doing the accounts when her partner Ewen MacColl came down and said they needed a song, urgently; Peggy…
Read More

Chinese women: linking PP and TH

"China's female professionals are fighting the world's lowest retirement age." The item in the FT caught my attention because it links my past and my present: the struggle for greater recognition for women's competences, across the full life course (Paula Principle, book done); and the changing definitions of where people stand in that life course (Triple Helix, book still very much to be done). I couldn't find trends on Chinese women's educational achievement in the OECD's comparative statistics. Gathering these will be a huge task. But I'd be willing to bet that in the metropolitan regions at least young Chinese women over outdoing their male contemporaries. However older women will…
Read More

GPG reporting internationally

Requiring companies to report on their gender pay gaps is becoming more common around the world. A 6-country analysis from the Global Institute for Women's Leadership at King's College London draws on 80 interviews with people well placed to judge what impact this is having, and what the main challenges are. The countries' scorecards are below. The report's conclusions are to some extent predictable (though none the less valid for all that): a need for greater transparency and accountability; stronger sanctions; measurable targets; and integration of policies to deal with GPGs at all levels. But the insights from the launch's widely experienced panel discussion were particularly valuable. More than one…
Read More

The Known World

"A man does not learn very well, Mr Robbins. Women, yes, because they are used to bending with whatever wind comes along. A woman, no matter what the age, is always learning, always becoming. But a man, if you will pardon me, stops learning at fourteen or so. He shuts it all down, Mr Robbins. A log is capable of learning more than a man. To teach a man would be a battle, a war, and I would lose." This is Fern Elston speaking, in Edward P. Jones' wonderfully original and informative novel about slavery, The Known World. Fern Elston is a free black woman, a teacher, and she is…
Read More

WEF report: double depression

The latest World Economic Forum report on the Gender Pay Gap is depressing for two reasons. I applaud the WEF for its attention to the issue, but I find its 'solution' simplistic. First, it shows that worldwide the cause of greater equality has been put into reverse. The latest trends means that it will take "a staggering 257 years to close the gap on economic participation for women – compared to 202 years in last year’s report." We know that the pandemic has added to women's unpaid work burdens; caused many women to drop out of the employment; and hit the occupations in which women tend to work harder than…
Read More

AI and Gender

We're starting to learn more about the biases buried deep within our data. Many of the knowledge bases that we have long thought of as objective turn out to be systematically skewed. I first became aware of this reading Mark Glezerman's Gender Medicine, which brought to light the way medical research uses evidence derived from research on men only. This can have literally fatal consequences, for example in the way women's strokes fail to be recognised and treated. Glezerman's book was followed by the better-known Invisible Women by Caroline Criado-Perez. Awareness of this has been boosted recently because of the way AI systems use existing data to bake in biases.…
Read More

GPG: the effects of age – a different ‘scarring’

I've just been through a major desk refurb. This was an actual physical reconstruction (courtesy of my brother-in-law's carpentering talents) and not just a clearing out of papers, but I did come across a few interesting items that had slipped out of sight. These included a press cutting from a few months ago on the gender pay gap for the over 50s. The piece cited a report from an organisation called Rest Less. I couldn't find the report on their website but the headline showed a median salary gap of 23% for full timers over 50, and 25% for those over 60. This is large in itself, but of course…
Read More

A sad consequence of the PP

South Korea is probably the most extreme example of the Paula Principle. The undervaluing of Korean women's competences is having tragic consequences. A very simple three-step process shows this, illustrated by the OECD charts below. First, Koreans have made quite extraordinary educational progress, if you compare the educational levels of 55-64 year olds with those two generations later. Secondly, it is Korean women who have been propelling this stellar rise up the educational tables. From very low levels a generation ago, 59% of young Korean women now enter Bachelor programmes - a lead of 6% over their male counterparts. The graduation rates are unfortunately missing from current OECD data, but…
Read More

Later life GPG, and specialisation

Well, it's a new year, and that has to be good news. If not, we're in trouble....No, it's time to be positive. Or at least persistent. I saw a recent news item which referred to research on gender pay differences by an organisation called Rest Less. The organisation's title sounds rather forbidding - no slacking here - but it offers advice and encouragement across a range of areas, including work, health and lifestyle. One section of the website that naturally appealed to me was on learning; it offers a good range of opportunities, for instance on courses leading to work in the field of health.. I could't find details of…
Read More

GPG reporting – what UK needs to do

The Fawcett Society and the Kings' College Global Institute for Women's Leadership have just published an interesting report comparing the UK to nine other countries in the practice of gender pay gap reporting. My impression has been that the legislation requiring companies with over 250 employees to produce a range of data on GPG was a big step forwards. I still think that; for one thing it's enabled people like ShareAction's AGM activists to ask probing questions of corporate behaviour - and their intentions for the future. Pushing the Paula Principle I've been able to put questions about career trajectories, as well as just pay gaps. There are some quite…
Read More

Peggy Seeger and crossovers

Forgive the self-indulgence, but I have to share a coincidence. Bear with me - there is more than one PP-related point to it. I was walking yesterday on Hampstead Heath, listening as I occasionally do to Michael Berkeley's programme of musical interviews, Private Passions. The guest this week was Peggy Seeger, the folk singer. At 86 she was sharp, full of humour and very open. Towards the end of the programme, Peggy talked about one of her most famous songs, "I want to be an engineer". She described its origins: she was doing the accounts when her partner Ewen MacColl came down and said they needed a song, urgently; Peggy…
Read More

Chinese women: linking PP and TH

"China's female professionals are fighting the world's lowest retirement age." The item in the FT caught my attention because it links my past and my present: the struggle for greater recognition for women's competences, across the full life course (Paula Principle, book done); and the changing definitions of where people stand in that life course (Triple Helix, book still very much to be done). I couldn't find trends on Chinese women's educational achievement in the OECD's comparative statistics. Gathering these will be a huge task. But I'd be willing to bet that in the metropolitan regions at least young Chinese women over outdoing their male contemporaries. However older women will…
Read More

GPG reporting internationally

Requiring companies to report on their gender pay gaps is becoming more common around the world. A 6-country analysis from the Global Institute for Women's Leadership at King's College London draws on 80 interviews with people well placed to judge what impact this is having, and what the main challenges are. The countries' scorecards are below. The report's conclusions are to some extent predictable (though none the less valid for all that): a need for greater transparency and accountability; stronger sanctions; measurable targets; and integration of policies to deal with GPGs at all levels. But the insights from the launch's widely experienced panel discussion were particularly valuable. More than one…
Read More

The Known World

"A man does not learn very well, Mr Robbins. Women, yes, because they are used to bending with whatever wind comes along. A woman, no matter what the age, is always learning, always becoming. But a man, if you will pardon me, stops learning at fourteen or so. He shuts it all down, Mr Robbins. A log is capable of learning more than a man. To teach a man would be a battle, a war, and I would lose." This is Fern Elston speaking, in Edward P. Jones' wonderfully original and informative novel about slavery, The Known World. Fern Elston is a free black woman, a teacher, and she is…
Read More

WEF report: double depression

The latest World Economic Forum report on the Gender Pay Gap is depressing for two reasons. I applaud the WEF for its attention to the issue, but I find its 'solution' simplistic. First, it shows that worldwide the cause of greater equality has been put into reverse. The latest trends means that it will take "a staggering 257 years to close the gap on economic participation for women – compared to 202 years in last year’s report." We know that the pandemic has added to women's unpaid work burdens; caused many women to drop out of the employment; and hit the occupations in which women tend to work harder than…
Read More

AI and Gender

We're starting to learn more about the biases buried deep within our data. Many of the knowledge bases that we have long thought of as objective turn out to be systematically skewed. I first became aware of this reading Mark Glezerman's Gender Medicine, which brought to light the way medical research uses evidence derived from research on men only. This can have literally fatal consequences, for example in the way women's strokes fail to be recognised and treated. Glezerman's book was followed by the better-known Invisible Women by Caroline Criado-Perez. Awareness of this has been boosted recently because of the way AI systems use existing data to bake in biases.…
Read More

GPG: the effects of age – a different ‘scarring’

I've just been through a major desk refurb. This was an actual physical reconstruction (courtesy of my brother-in-law's carpentering talents) and not just a clearing out of papers, but I did come across a few interesting items that had slipped out of sight. These included a press cutting from a few months ago on the gender pay gap for the over 50s. The piece cited a report from an organisation called Rest Less. I couldn't find the report on their website but the headline showed a median salary gap of 23% for full timers over 50, and 25% for those over 60. This is large in itself, but of course…
Read More

A sad consequence of the PP

South Korea is probably the most extreme example of the Paula Principle. The undervaluing of Korean women's competences is having tragic consequences. A very simple three-step process shows this, illustrated by the OECD charts below. First, Koreans have made quite extraordinary educational progress, if you compare the educational levels of 55-64 year olds with those two generations later. Secondly, it is Korean women who have been propelling this stellar rise up the educational tables. From very low levels a generation ago, 59% of young Korean women now enter Bachelor programmes - a lead of 6% over their male counterparts. The graduation rates are unfortunately missing from current OECD data, but…
Read More

Later life GPG, and specialisation

Well, it's a new year, and that has to be good news. If not, we're in trouble....No, it's time to be positive. Or at least persistent. I saw a recent news item which referred to research on gender pay differences by an organisation called Rest Less. The organisation's title sounds rather forbidding - no slacking here - but it offers advice and encouragement across a range of areas, including work, health and lifestyle. One section of the website that naturally appealed to me was on learning; it offers a good range of opportunities, for instance on courses leading to work in the field of health.. I could't find details of…
Read More

GPG reporting – what UK needs to do

The Fawcett Society and the Kings' College Global Institute for Women's Leadership have just published an interesting report comparing the UK to nine other countries in the practice of gender pay gap reporting. My impression has been that the legislation requiring companies with over 250 employees to produce a range of data on GPG was a big step forwards. I still think that; for one thing it's enabled people like ShareAction's AGM activists to ask probing questions of corporate behaviour - and their intentions for the future. Pushing the Paula Principle I've been able to put questions about career trajectories, as well as just pay gaps. There are some quite…
Read More

Peggy Seeger and crossovers

Forgive the self-indulgence, but I have to share a coincidence. Bear with me - there is more than one PP-related point to it. I was walking yesterday on Hampstead Heath, listening as I occasionally do to Michael Berkeley's programme of musical interviews, Private Passions. The guest this week was Peggy Seeger, the folk singer. At 86 she was sharp, full of humour and very open. Towards the end of the programme, Peggy talked about one of her most famous songs, "I want to be an engineer". She described its origins: she was doing the accounts when her partner Ewen MacColl came down and said they needed a song, urgently; Peggy…
Read More

Chinese women: linking PP and TH

"China's female professionals are fighting the world's lowest retirement age." The item in the FT caught my attention because it links my past and my present: the struggle for greater recognition for women's competences, across the full life course (Paula Principle, book done); and the changing definitions of where people stand in that life course (Triple Helix, book still very much to be done). I couldn't find trends on Chinese women's educational achievement in the OECD's comparative statistics. Gathering these will be a huge task. But I'd be willing to bet that in the metropolitan regions at least young Chinese women over outdoing their male contemporaries. However older women will…
Read More

GPG reporting internationally

Requiring companies to report on their gender pay gaps is becoming more common around the world. A 6-country analysis from the Global Institute for Women's Leadership at King's College London draws on 80 interviews with people well placed to judge what impact this is having, and what the main challenges are. The countries' scorecards are below. The report's conclusions are to some extent predictable (though none the less valid for all that): a need for greater transparency and accountability; stronger sanctions; measurable targets; and integration of policies to deal with GPGs at all levels. But the insights from the launch's widely experienced panel discussion were particularly valuable. More than one…
Read More

The Known World

"A man does not learn very well, Mr Robbins. Women, yes, because they are used to bending with whatever wind comes along. A woman, no matter what the age, is always learning, always becoming. But a man, if you will pardon me, stops learning at fourteen or so. He shuts it all down, Mr Robbins. A log is capable of learning more than a man. To teach a man would be a battle, a war, and I would lose." This is Fern Elston speaking, in Edward P. Jones' wonderfully original and informative novel about slavery, The Known World. Fern Elston is a free black woman, a teacher, and she is…
Read More

WEF report: double depression

The latest World Economic Forum report on the Gender Pay Gap is depressing for two reasons. I applaud the WEF for its attention to the issue, but I find its 'solution' simplistic. First, it shows that worldwide the cause of greater equality has been put into reverse. The latest trends means that it will take "a staggering 257 years to close the gap on economic participation for women – compared to 202 years in last year’s report." We know that the pandemic has added to women's unpaid work burdens; caused many women to drop out of the employment; and hit the occupations in which women tend to work harder than…
Read More

AI and Gender

We're starting to learn more about the biases buried deep within our data. Many of the knowledge bases that we have long thought of as objective turn out to be systematically skewed. I first became aware of this reading Mark Glezerman's Gender Medicine, which brought to light the way medical research uses evidence derived from research on men only. This can have literally fatal consequences, for example in the way women's strokes fail to be recognised and treated. Glezerman's book was followed by the better-known Invisible Women by Caroline Criado-Perez. Awareness of this has been boosted recently because of the way AI systems use existing data to bake in biases.…
Read More

GPG: the effects of age – a different ‘scarring’

I've just been through a major desk refurb. This was an actual physical reconstruction (courtesy of my brother-in-law's carpentering talents) and not just a clearing out of papers, but I did come across a few interesting items that had slipped out of sight. These included a press cutting from a few months ago on the gender pay gap for the over 50s. The piece cited a report from an organisation called Rest Less. I couldn't find the report on their website but the headline showed a median salary gap of 23% for full timers over 50, and 25% for those over 60. This is large in itself, but of course…
Read More

A sad consequence of the PP

South Korea is probably the most extreme example of the Paula Principle. The undervaluing of Korean women's competences is having tragic consequences. A very simple three-step process shows this, illustrated by the OECD charts below. First, Koreans have made quite extraordinary educational progress, if you compare the educational levels of 55-64 year olds with those two generations later. Secondly, it is Korean women who have been propelling this stellar rise up the educational tables. From very low levels a generation ago, 59% of young Korean women now enter Bachelor programmes - a lead of 6% over their male counterparts. The graduation rates are unfortunately missing from current OECD data, but…
Read More

Later life GPG, and specialisation

Well, it's a new year, and that has to be good news. If not, we're in trouble....No, it's time to be positive. Or at least persistent. I saw a recent news item which referred to research on gender pay differences by an organisation called Rest Less. The organisation's title sounds rather forbidding - no slacking here - but it offers advice and encouragement across a range of areas, including work, health and lifestyle. One section of the website that naturally appealed to me was on learning; it offers a good range of opportunities, for instance on courses leading to work in the field of health.. I could't find details of…
Read More

GPG reporting – what UK needs to do

The Fawcett Society and the Kings' College Global Institute for Women's Leadership have just published an interesting report comparing the UK to nine other countries in the practice of gender pay gap reporting. My impression has been that the legislation requiring companies with over 250 employees to produce a range of data on GPG was a big step forwards. I still think that; for one thing it's enabled people like ShareAction's AGM activists to ask probing questions of corporate behaviour - and their intentions for the future. Pushing the Paula Principle I've been able to put questions about career trajectories, as well as just pay gaps. There are some quite…
Read More

Peggy Seeger and crossovers

Forgive the self-indulgence, but I have to share a coincidence. Bear with me - there is more than one PP-related point to it. I was walking yesterday on Hampstead Heath, listening as I occasionally do to Michael Berkeley's programme of musical interviews, Private Passions. The guest this week was Peggy Seeger, the folk singer. At 86 she was sharp, full of humour and very open. Towards the end of the programme, Peggy talked about one of her most famous songs, "I want to be an engineer". She described its origins: she was doing the accounts when her partner Ewen MacColl came down and said they needed a song, urgently; Peggy…
Read More

Chinese women: linking PP and TH

"China's female professionals are fighting the world's lowest retirement age." The item in the FT caught my attention because it links my past and my present: the struggle for greater recognition for women's competences, across the full life course (Paula Principle, book done); and the changing definitions of where people stand in that life course (Triple Helix, book still very much to be done). I couldn't find trends on Chinese women's educational achievement in the OECD's comparative statistics. Gathering these will be a huge task. But I'd be willing to bet that in the metropolitan regions at least young Chinese women over outdoing their male contemporaries. However older women will…
Read More

GPG reporting internationally

Requiring companies to report on their gender pay gaps is becoming more common around the world. A 6-country analysis from the Global Institute for Women's Leadership at King's College London draws on 80 interviews with people well placed to judge what impact this is having, and what the main challenges are. The countries' scorecards are below. The report's conclusions are to some extent predictable (though none the less valid for all that): a need for greater transparency and accountability; stronger sanctions; measurable targets; and integration of policies to deal with GPGs at all levels. But the insights from the launch's widely experienced panel discussion were particularly valuable. More than one…
Read More

The Known World

"A man does not learn very well, Mr Robbins. Women, yes, because they are used to bending with whatever wind comes along. A woman, no matter what the age, is always learning, always becoming. But a man, if you will pardon me, stops learning at fourteen or so. He shuts it all down, Mr Robbins. A log is capable of learning more than a man. To teach a man would be a battle, a war, and I would lose." This is Fern Elston speaking, in Edward P. Jones' wonderfully original and informative novel about slavery, The Known World. Fern Elston is a free black woman, a teacher, and she is…
Read More

WEF report: double depression

The latest World Economic Forum report on the Gender Pay Gap is depressing for two reasons. I applaud the WEF for its attention to the issue, but I find its 'solution' simplistic. First, it shows that worldwide the cause of greater equality has been put into reverse. The latest trends means that it will take "a staggering 257 years to close the gap on economic participation for women – compared to 202 years in last year’s report." We know that the pandemic has added to women's unpaid work burdens; caused many women to drop out of the employment; and hit the occupations in which women tend to work harder than…
Read More

AI and Gender

We're starting to learn more about the biases buried deep within our data. Many of the knowledge bases that we have long thought of as objective turn out to be systematically skewed. I first became aware of this reading Mark Glezerman's Gender Medicine, which brought to light the way medical research uses evidence derived from research on men only. This can have literally fatal consequences, for example in the way women's strokes fail to be recognised and treated. Glezerman's book was followed by the better-known Invisible Women by Caroline Criado-Perez. Awareness of this has been boosted recently because of the way AI systems use existing data to bake in biases.…
Read More

GPG: the effects of age – a different ‘scarring’

I've just been through a major desk refurb. This was an actual physical reconstruction (courtesy of my brother-in-law's carpentering talents) and not just a clearing out of papers, but I did come across a few interesting items that had slipped out of sight. These included a press cutting from a few months ago on the gender pay gap for the over 50s. The piece cited a report from an organisation called Rest Less. I couldn't find the report on their website but the headline showed a median salary gap of 23% for full timers over 50, and 25% for those over 60. This is large in itself, but of course…
Read More

A sad consequence of the PP

South Korea is probably the most extreme example of the Paula Principle. The undervaluing of Korean women's competences is having tragic consequences. A very simple three-step process shows this, illustrated by the OECD charts below. First, Koreans have made quite extraordinary educational progress, if you compare the educational levels of 55-64 year olds with those two generations later. Secondly, it is Korean women who have been propelling this stellar rise up the educational tables. From very low levels a generation ago, 59% of young Korean women now enter Bachelor programmes - a lead of 6% over their male counterparts. The graduation rates are unfortunately missing from current OECD data, but…
Read More

Later life GPG, and specialisation

Well, it's a new year, and that has to be good news. If not, we're in trouble....No, it's time to be positive. Or at least persistent. I saw a recent news item which referred to research on gender pay differences by an organisation called Rest Less. The organisation's title sounds rather forbidding - no slacking here - but it offers advice and encouragement across a range of areas, including work, health and lifestyle. One section of the website that naturally appealed to me was on learning; it offers a good range of opportunities, for instance on courses leading to work in the field of health.. I could't find details of…
Read More

GPG reporting – what UK needs to do

The Fawcett Society and the Kings' College Global Institute for Women's Leadership have just published an interesting report comparing the UK to nine other countries in the practice of gender pay gap reporting. My impression has been that the legislation requiring companies with over 250 employees to produce a range of data on GPG was a big step forwards. I still think that; for one thing it's enabled people like ShareAction's AGM activists to ask probing questions of corporate behaviour - and their intentions for the future. Pushing the Paula Principle I've been able to put questions about career trajectories, as well as just pay gaps. There are some quite…
Read More

Peggy Seeger and crossovers

Forgive the self-indulgence, but I have to share a coincidence. Bear with me - there is more than one PP-related point to it. I was walking yesterday on Hampstead Heath, listening as I occasionally do to Michael Berkeley's programme of musical interviews, Private Passions. The guest this week was Peggy Seeger, the folk singer. At 86 she was sharp, full of humour and very open. Towards the end of the programme, Peggy talked about one of her most famous songs, "I want to be an engineer". She described its origins: she was doing the accounts when her partner Ewen MacColl came down and said they needed a song, urgently; Peggy…
Read More

Chinese women: linking PP and TH

"China's female professionals are fighting the world's lowest retirement age." The item in the FT caught my attention because it links my past and my present: the struggle for greater recognition for women's competences, across the full life course (Paula Principle, book done); and the changing definitions of where people stand in that life course (Triple Helix, book still very much to be done). I couldn't find trends on Chinese women's educational achievement in the OECD's comparative statistics. Gathering these will be a huge task. But I'd be willing to bet that in the metropolitan regions at least young Chinese women over outdoing their male contemporaries. However older women will…
Read More

GPG reporting internationally

Requiring companies to report on their gender pay gaps is becoming more common around the world. A 6-country analysis from the Global Institute for Women's Leadership at King's College London draws on 80 interviews with people well placed to judge what impact this is having, and what the main challenges are. The countries' scorecards are below. The report's conclusions are to some extent predictable (though none the less valid for all that): a need for greater transparency and accountability; stronger sanctions; measurable targets; and integration of policies to deal with GPGs at all levels. But the insights from the launch's widely experienced panel discussion were particularly valuable. More than one…
Read More

The Known World

"A man does not learn very well, Mr Robbins. Women, yes, because they are used to bending with whatever wind comes along. A woman, no matter what the age, is always learning, always becoming. But a man, if you will pardon me, stops learning at fourteen or so. He shuts it all down, Mr Robbins. A log is capable of learning more than a man. To teach a man would be a battle, a war, and I would lose." This is Fern Elston speaking, in Edward P. Jones' wonderfully original and informative novel about slavery, The Known World. Fern Elston is a free black woman, a teacher, and she is…
Read More

WEF report: double depression

The latest World Economic Forum report on the Gender Pay Gap is depressing for two reasons. I applaud the WEF for its attention to the issue, but I find its 'solution' simplistic. First, it shows that worldwide the cause of greater equality has been put into reverse. The latest trends means that it will take "a staggering 257 years to close the gap on economic participation for women – compared to 202 years in last year’s report." We know that the pandemic has added to women's unpaid work burdens; caused many women to drop out of the employment; and hit the occupations in which women tend to work harder than…
Read More

AI and Gender

We're starting to learn more about the biases buried deep within our data. Many of the knowledge bases that we have long thought of as objective turn out to be systematically skewed. I first became aware of this reading Mark Glezerman's Gender Medicine, which brought to light the way medical research uses evidence derived from research on men only. This can have literally fatal consequences, for example in the way women's strokes fail to be recognised and treated. Glezerman's book was followed by the better-known Invisible Women by Caroline Criado-Perez. Awareness of this has been boosted recently because of the way AI systems use existing data to bake in biases.…
Read More

GPG: the effects of age – a different ‘scarring’

I've just been through a major desk refurb. This was an actual physical reconstruction (courtesy of my brother-in-law's carpentering talents) and not just a clearing out of papers, but I did come across a few interesting items that had slipped out of sight. These included a press cutting from a few months ago on the gender pay gap for the over 50s. The piece cited a report from an organisation called Rest Less. I couldn't find the report on their website but the headline showed a median salary gap of 23% for full timers over 50, and 25% for those over 60. This is large in itself, but of course…
Read More

A sad consequence of the PP

South Korea is probably the most extreme example of the Paula Principle. The undervaluing of Korean women's competences is having tragic consequences. A very simple three-step process shows this, illustrated by the OECD charts below. First, Koreans have made quite extraordinary educational progress, if you compare the educational levels of 55-64 year olds with those two generations later. Secondly, it is Korean women who have been propelling this stellar rise up the educational tables. From very low levels a generation ago, 59% of young Korean women now enter Bachelor programmes - a lead of 6% over their male counterparts. The graduation rates are unfortunately missing from current OECD data, but…
Read More

Later life GPG, and specialisation

Well, it's a new year, and that has to be good news. If not, we're in trouble....No, it's time to be positive. Or at least persistent. I saw a recent news item which referred to research on gender pay differences by an organisation called Rest Less. The organisation's title sounds rather forbidding - no slacking here - but it offers advice and encouragement across a range of areas, including work, health and lifestyle. One section of the website that naturally appealed to me was on learning; it offers a good range of opportunities, for instance on courses leading to work in the field of health.. I could't find details of…
Read More

GPG reporting – what UK needs to do

The Fawcett Society and the Kings' College Global Institute for Women's Leadership have just published an interesting report comparing the UK to nine other countries in the practice of gender pay gap reporting. My impression has been that the legislation requiring companies with over 250 employees to produce a range of data on GPG was a big step forwards. I still think that; for one thing it's enabled people like ShareAction's AGM activists to ask probing questions of corporate behaviour - and their intentions for the future. Pushing the Paula Principle I've been able to put questions about career trajectories, as well as just pay gaps. There are some quite…
Read More

Peggy Seeger and crossovers

Forgive the self-indulgence, but I have to share a coincidence. Bear with me - there is more than one PP-related point to it. I was walking yesterday on Hampstead Heath, listening as I occasionally do to Michael Berkeley's programme of musical interviews, Private Passions. The guest this week was Peggy Seeger, the folk singer. At 86 she was sharp, full of humour and very open. Towards the end of the programme, Peggy talked about one of her most famous songs, "I want to be an engineer". She described its origins: she was doing the accounts when her partner Ewen MacColl came down and said they needed a song, urgently; Peggy…
Read More

Chinese women: linking PP and TH

"China's female professionals are fighting the world's lowest retirement age." The item in the FT caught my attention because it links my past and my present: the struggle for greater recognition for women's competences, across the full life course (Paula Principle, book done); and the changing definitions of where people stand in that life course (Triple Helix, book still very much to be done). I couldn't find trends on Chinese women's educational achievement in the OECD's comparative statistics. Gathering these will be a huge task. But I'd be willing to bet that in the metropolitan regions at least young Chinese women over outdoing their male contemporaries. However older women will…
Read More

GPG reporting internationally

Requiring companies to report on their gender pay gaps is becoming more common around the world. A 6-country analysis from the Global Institute for Women's Leadership at King's College London draws on 80 interviews with people well placed to judge what impact this is having, and what the main challenges are. The countries' scorecards are below. The report's conclusions are to some extent predictable (though none the less valid for all that): a need for greater transparency and accountability; stronger sanctions; measurable targets; and integration of policies to deal with GPGs at all levels. But the insights from the launch's widely experienced panel discussion were particularly valuable. More than one…
Read More

The Known World

"A man does not learn very well, Mr Robbins. Women, yes, because they are used to bending with whatever wind comes along. A woman, no matter what the age, is always learning, always becoming. But a man, if you will pardon me, stops learning at fourteen or so. He shuts it all down, Mr Robbins. A log is capable of learning more than a man. To teach a man would be a battle, a war, and I would lose." This is Fern Elston speaking, in Edward P. Jones' wonderfully original and informative novel about slavery, The Known World. Fern Elston is a free black woman, a teacher, and she is…
Read More

WEF report: double depression

The latest World Economic Forum report on the Gender Pay Gap is depressing for two reasons. I applaud the WEF for its attention to the issue, but I find its 'solution' simplistic. First, it shows that worldwide the cause of greater equality has been put into reverse. The latest trends means that it will take "a staggering 257 years to close the gap on economic participation for women – compared to 202 years in last year’s report." We know that the pandemic has added to women's unpaid work burdens; caused many women to drop out of the employment; and hit the occupations in which women tend to work harder than…
Read More

AI and Gender

We're starting to learn more about the biases buried deep within our data. Many of the knowledge bases that we have long thought of as objective turn out to be systematically skewed. I first became aware of this reading Mark Glezerman's Gender Medicine, which brought to light the way medical research uses evidence derived from research on men only. This can have literally fatal consequences, for example in the way women's strokes fail to be recognised and treated. Glezerman's book was followed by the better-known Invisible Women by Caroline Criado-Perez. Awareness of this has been boosted recently because of the way AI systems use existing data to bake in biases.…
Read More

GPG: the effects of age – a different ‘scarring’

I've just been through a major desk refurb. This was an actual physical reconstruction (courtesy of my brother-in-law's carpentering talents) and not just a clearing out of papers, but I did come across a few interesting items that had slipped out of sight. These included a press cutting from a few months ago on the gender pay gap for the over 50s. The piece cited a report from an organisation called Rest Less. I couldn't find the report on their website but the headline showed a median salary gap of 23% for full timers over 50, and 25% for those over 60. This is large in itself, but of course…
Read More

A sad consequence of the PP

South Korea is probably the most extreme example of the Paula Principle. The undervaluing of Korean women's competences is having tragic consequences. A very simple three-step process shows this, illustrated by the OECD charts below. First, Koreans have made quite extraordinary educational progress, if you compare the educational levels of 55-64 year olds with those two generations later. Secondly, it is Korean women who have been propelling this stellar rise up the educational tables. From very low levels a generation ago, 59% of young Korean women now enter Bachelor programmes - a lead of 6% over their male counterparts. The graduation rates are unfortunately missing from current OECD data, but…
Read More

Later life GPG, and specialisation

Well, it's a new year, and that has to be good news. If not, we're in trouble....No, it's time to be positive. Or at least persistent. I saw a recent news item which referred to research on gender pay differences by an organisation called Rest Less. The organisation's title sounds rather forbidding - no slacking here - but it offers advice and encouragement across a range of areas, including work, health and lifestyle. One section of the website that naturally appealed to me was on learning; it offers a good range of opportunities, for instance on courses leading to work in the field of health.. I could't find details of…
Read More

GPG reporting – what UK needs to do

The Fawcett Society and the Kings' College Global Institute for Women's Leadership have just published an interesting report comparing the UK to nine other countries in the practice of gender pay gap reporting. My impression has been that the legislation requiring companies with over 250 employees to produce a range of data on GPG was a big step forwards. I still think that; for one thing it's enabled people like ShareAction's AGM activists to ask probing questions of corporate behaviour - and their intentions for the future. Pushing the Paula Principle I've been able to put questions about career trajectories, as well as just pay gaps. There are some quite…
Read More