Chicken Behaviour and Collective Intelligence

I've just finished Robert Sapolsky's Behave: the biology of humans at our best and worst.  It's a massive book, covering the development of our brains and our behaviour from the moment of conception, set firmly in the context of long-run evolutionary trends.  The early parts were tough going for a scientific illiterate, notwithstanding Sapolsky's breezy humour,  but if you persevere there are huge numbers of plums in this rich pudding. Sapolsky's overall message is (and I quote), "It's complicated."   Life, development and behaviour are all a matter of a vast number of interactions that take place in a wide variety of contexts.  We may have learnt a lot, but at…
Read More

Speakers for schools, and caring

I do the occasional gig for Speakers for Schools.  This admirable organisation was started by Robert Peston. He kept being invited by private schools to give talks to their students, and felt that students in state schools should also have access to the kinds of insights that he and other public figures bring.  So SfS has built up a panel of people willing to go and talk at state schools, on whatever issues might help to enlarge students'  perspectives on life. I do not, of course, generate quite the buzz that I'm sure RP does, but I've enjoyed talking about the Paula Principle in a range of schools over the…
Read More

Working for free – a rugby player’s view

My eye was caught by a piece by Catherine Spencer in yesterday's Guardian.  Catherine is a former captain of the England women's rugby team, and author of a charmingly alliterative book Mud, Maul, Mascara.  She starts with the observation that men in the England rugby team are paid £25K per match, whilst their Japanese counterparts get barely enough to cover meagre subsistence costs. Catherine goes on to argue not against professional payments generally, but that the revenue generated by international matches should go back into the grassroots.  She says that it cannot be money that motivates people to want to play for their country - pointing out that the Japanese…
Read More

GPGs 1 and 2 – the gender pensions gap

One of the major implications of the Paula Principle is that it applies over the life course, so we need to estimate its effects over this full span.  GPG1 - the gender pay gap - leads inexorably to GPG2 - the gender pensions gap.  The gap is big, and it can last a very long time. I suppose technically a 'gap' requires men to be alive in order for their pensions to be compared with equivalent women, but women live longer and so even if their male peers are no longer there they suffer the effects of GPG2.  (I'm not ignoring the salience of differential longevities, but they aren't relevant…
Read More

Autumn Sonata

I went last night, as I often do on a Tuesday, to a gathering that is rapidly gaining a reputation as a North London institution - the Tufnell Park Film Club.  We sit in the upstairs room of the Lord Palmerston and watch a film, selected with the help of our two viddymasters, Nigel and Wayne. Last night's film was Autumn Sonata, Ingrid Bergman's last film, directed by her namesake Ingmar.  On the way there my friend Mark wondered just how bleak the film was going to be.  I had seen it some time ago, so risked an answer - wrongly so.  Seduced by the title, and the colouring of…
Read More

What does ‘closing the GPG’ actually mean?

I've been trying to get a handle on what kind of progress has been made in closing the gender pay gap, and this has led me to ask myself what 'closing the gap' actually means.  It seems to me that the obvious 'zero gap = equality = fairness' may disguise something important. The Paula Principle is about the due recognition of women's competences, and I'm mostly interested in career trajectories over time, ie what kinds of progression women make.  But pay is obviously the most available indicator, and the ONS has recently published some important data on trends over time on the GPG.  (By the way, I want to say 'chapeau'…
Read More

Collective intelligence

One of the of soft skills commonly touted as of growing importance for organisational success is the capacity to work successfully with others.  'Teamwork' is the most familiar label for this, but I think this sounds a little simplistic.  Brenda, one of my interviewees in The Paula Principle, put it this way: Women are interested in getting stuff done;  they hate game-playing and internal politicking; the only build networks if they see them as a genuine vehicle for getting things done, and not for personal advancement.  Their language is about 'we', about looking for complementary skills in a team, recognising that they themselves cannot do it all. I've just been reading Superminds by Thomas Malone.…
Read More

Productivity and the PP

Last month, global leaders from governments, private sector companies, trade unions and civil society pledged to take concrete action towards closing the gender pay gap by 2030. The global commitments – to ensure women in every sector of the workforce are paid equally to men for doing work of equal value – were made at the Equal Pay International Coalition (EPIC) Pledging event held during the United Nations General Assembly in New York. As part of the rationale for the initiative, Secretary-General of the OECD, Angel Gurría, said, “Gender pay gaps are not only unfair for those who suffer them, but they are also detrimental to our economies. If you do not have…
Read More

How a GPG deters potential recruits

The requirement on organisations with over 250 employees to report on their Gender Pay Gap (GPG) is starting to raise some interesting issues.  The latest amongst these is a survey carried out by BMG Research  for the Equalities and Human Rights Commission. Nearly two-thirds (61%) of women agreed that if their organisation had a gender pay gap it would make it more likely they would select an employer without a gap. And more than half (58%) agreed it would make them less likely to recommend their employer as a place to work.  More details in the chart below. It seems that those surveyed (men as well as women) were just…
Read More

Using our skills properly

How many times have you listened to or read dreary rhetoric about the need to up our skills level?  It is perfectly true that we don't give nearly enough respect, or money, to the less prestigious kinds of skills, notably those that are developed in the further rather than higher education sector.  But the important questions are around how well competences are actually used. This is, of course, the exact focus of the Paula Principle.  It's also the topic of a telling new report from the CIPD.  Here is its sweeping overall judgement (my stress):  The focus of skills policy over the last three decades has been almost exclusively on…
Read More

Chicken Behaviour and Collective Intelligence

I've just finished Robert Sapolsky's Behave: the biology of humans at our best and worst.  It's a massive book, covering the development of our brains and our behaviour from the moment of conception, set firmly in the context of long-run evolutionary trends.  The early parts were tough going for a scientific illiterate, notwithstanding Sapolsky's breezy humour,  but if you persevere there are huge numbers of plums in this rich pudding. Sapolsky's overall message is (and I quote), "It's complicated."   Life, development and behaviour are all a matter of a vast number of interactions that take place in a wide variety of contexts.  We may have learnt a lot, but at…
Read More

Speakers for schools, and caring

I do the occasional gig for Speakers for Schools.  This admirable organisation was started by Robert Peston. He kept being invited by private schools to give talks to their students, and felt that students in state schools should also have access to the kinds of insights that he and other public figures bring.  So SfS has built up a panel of people willing to go and talk at state schools, on whatever issues might help to enlarge students'  perspectives on life. I do not, of course, generate quite the buzz that I'm sure RP does, but I've enjoyed talking about the Paula Principle in a range of schools over the…
Read More

Working for free – a rugby player’s view

My eye was caught by a piece by Catherine Spencer in yesterday's Guardian.  Catherine is a former captain of the England women's rugby team, and author of a charmingly alliterative book Mud, Maul, Mascara.  She starts with the observation that men in the England rugby team are paid £25K per match, whilst their Japanese counterparts get barely enough to cover meagre subsistence costs. Catherine goes on to argue not against professional payments generally, but that the revenue generated by international matches should go back into the grassroots.  She says that it cannot be money that motivates people to want to play for their country - pointing out that the Japanese…
Read More

GPGs 1 and 2 – the gender pensions gap

One of the major implications of the Paula Principle is that it applies over the life course, so we need to estimate its effects over this full span.  GPG1 - the gender pay gap - leads inexorably to GPG2 - the gender pensions gap.  The gap is big, and it can last a very long time. I suppose technically a 'gap' requires men to be alive in order for their pensions to be compared with equivalent women, but women live longer and so even if their male peers are no longer there they suffer the effects of GPG2.  (I'm not ignoring the salience of differential longevities, but they aren't relevant…
Read More

Autumn Sonata

I went last night, as I often do on a Tuesday, to a gathering that is rapidly gaining a reputation as a North London institution - the Tufnell Park Film Club.  We sit in the upstairs room of the Lord Palmerston and watch a film, selected with the help of our two viddymasters, Nigel and Wayne. Last night's film was Autumn Sonata, Ingrid Bergman's last film, directed by her namesake Ingmar.  On the way there my friend Mark wondered just how bleak the film was going to be.  I had seen it some time ago, so risked an answer - wrongly so.  Seduced by the title, and the colouring of…
Read More

What does ‘closing the GPG’ actually mean?

I've been trying to get a handle on what kind of progress has been made in closing the gender pay gap, and this has led me to ask myself what 'closing the gap' actually means.  It seems to me that the obvious 'zero gap = equality = fairness' may disguise something important. The Paula Principle is about the due recognition of women's competences, and I'm mostly interested in career trajectories over time, ie what kinds of progression women make.  But pay is obviously the most available indicator, and the ONS has recently published some important data on trends over time on the GPG.  (By the way, I want to say 'chapeau'…
Read More

Collective intelligence

One of the of soft skills commonly touted as of growing importance for organisational success is the capacity to work successfully with others.  'Teamwork' is the most familiar label for this, but I think this sounds a little simplistic.  Brenda, one of my interviewees in The Paula Principle, put it this way: Women are interested in getting stuff done;  they hate game-playing and internal politicking; the only build networks if they see them as a genuine vehicle for getting things done, and not for personal advancement.  Their language is about 'we', about looking for complementary skills in a team, recognising that they themselves cannot do it all. I've just been reading Superminds by Thomas Malone.…
Read More

Productivity and the PP

Last month, global leaders from governments, private sector companies, trade unions and civil society pledged to take concrete action towards closing the gender pay gap by 2030. The global commitments – to ensure women in every sector of the workforce are paid equally to men for doing work of equal value – were made at the Equal Pay International Coalition (EPIC) Pledging event held during the United Nations General Assembly in New York. As part of the rationale for the initiative, Secretary-General of the OECD, Angel Gurría, said, “Gender pay gaps are not only unfair for those who suffer them, but they are also detrimental to our economies. If you do not have…
Read More

How a GPG deters potential recruits

The requirement on organisations with over 250 employees to report on their Gender Pay Gap (GPG) is starting to raise some interesting issues.  The latest amongst these is a survey carried out by BMG Research  for the Equalities and Human Rights Commission. Nearly two-thirds (61%) of women agreed that if their organisation had a gender pay gap it would make it more likely they would select an employer without a gap. And more than half (58%) agreed it would make them less likely to recommend their employer as a place to work.  More details in the chart below. It seems that those surveyed (men as well as women) were just…
Read More

Using our skills properly

How many times have you listened to or read dreary rhetoric about the need to up our skills level?  It is perfectly true that we don't give nearly enough respect, or money, to the less prestigious kinds of skills, notably those that are developed in the further rather than higher education sector.  But the important questions are around how well competences are actually used. This is, of course, the exact focus of the Paula Principle.  It's also the topic of a telling new report from the CIPD.  Here is its sweeping overall judgement (my stress):  The focus of skills policy over the last three decades has been almost exclusively on…
Read More

Chicken Behaviour and Collective Intelligence

I've just finished Robert Sapolsky's Behave: the biology of humans at our best and worst.  It's a massive book, covering the development of our brains and our behaviour from the moment of conception, set firmly in the context of long-run evolutionary trends.  The early parts were tough going for a scientific illiterate, notwithstanding Sapolsky's breezy humour,  but if you persevere there are huge numbers of plums in this rich pudding. Sapolsky's overall message is (and I quote), "It's complicated."   Life, development and behaviour are all a matter of a vast number of interactions that take place in a wide variety of contexts.  We may have learnt a lot, but at…
Read More

Speakers for schools, and caring

I do the occasional gig for Speakers for Schools.  This admirable organisation was started by Robert Peston. He kept being invited by private schools to give talks to their students, and felt that students in state schools should also have access to the kinds of insights that he and other public figures bring.  So SfS has built up a panel of people willing to go and talk at state schools, on whatever issues might help to enlarge students'  perspectives on life. I do not, of course, generate quite the buzz that I'm sure RP does, but I've enjoyed talking about the Paula Principle in a range of schools over the…
Read More

Working for free – a rugby player’s view

My eye was caught by a piece by Catherine Spencer in yesterday's Guardian.  Catherine is a former captain of the England women's rugby team, and author of a charmingly alliterative book Mud, Maul, Mascara.  She starts with the observation that men in the England rugby team are paid £25K per match, whilst their Japanese counterparts get barely enough to cover meagre subsistence costs. Catherine goes on to argue not against professional payments generally, but that the revenue generated by international matches should go back into the grassroots.  She says that it cannot be money that motivates people to want to play for their country - pointing out that the Japanese…
Read More

GPGs 1 and 2 – the gender pensions gap

One of the major implications of the Paula Principle is that it applies over the life course, so we need to estimate its effects over this full span.  GPG1 - the gender pay gap - leads inexorably to GPG2 - the gender pensions gap.  The gap is big, and it can last a very long time. I suppose technically a 'gap' requires men to be alive in order for their pensions to be compared with equivalent women, but women live longer and so even if their male peers are no longer there they suffer the effects of GPG2.  (I'm not ignoring the salience of differential longevities, but they aren't relevant…
Read More

Autumn Sonata

I went last night, as I often do on a Tuesday, to a gathering that is rapidly gaining a reputation as a North London institution - the Tufnell Park Film Club.  We sit in the upstairs room of the Lord Palmerston and watch a film, selected with the help of our two viddymasters, Nigel and Wayne. Last night's film was Autumn Sonata, Ingrid Bergman's last film, directed by her namesake Ingmar.  On the way there my friend Mark wondered just how bleak the film was going to be.  I had seen it some time ago, so risked an answer - wrongly so.  Seduced by the title, and the colouring of…
Read More

What does ‘closing the GPG’ actually mean?

I've been trying to get a handle on what kind of progress has been made in closing the gender pay gap, and this has led me to ask myself what 'closing the gap' actually means.  It seems to me that the obvious 'zero gap = equality = fairness' may disguise something important. The Paula Principle is about the due recognition of women's competences, and I'm mostly interested in career trajectories over time, ie what kinds of progression women make.  But pay is obviously the most available indicator, and the ONS has recently published some important data on trends over time on the GPG.  (By the way, I want to say 'chapeau'…
Read More

Collective intelligence

One of the of soft skills commonly touted as of growing importance for organisational success is the capacity to work successfully with others.  'Teamwork' is the most familiar label for this, but I think this sounds a little simplistic.  Brenda, one of my interviewees in The Paula Principle, put it this way: Women are interested in getting stuff done;  they hate game-playing and internal politicking; the only build networks if they see them as a genuine vehicle for getting things done, and not for personal advancement.  Their language is about 'we', about looking for complementary skills in a team, recognising that they themselves cannot do it all. I've just been reading Superminds by Thomas Malone.…
Read More

Productivity and the PP

Last month, global leaders from governments, private sector companies, trade unions and civil society pledged to take concrete action towards closing the gender pay gap by 2030. The global commitments – to ensure women in every sector of the workforce are paid equally to men for doing work of equal value – were made at the Equal Pay International Coalition (EPIC) Pledging event held during the United Nations General Assembly in New York. As part of the rationale for the initiative, Secretary-General of the OECD, Angel Gurría, said, “Gender pay gaps are not only unfair for those who suffer them, but they are also detrimental to our economies. If you do not have…
Read More

How a GPG deters potential recruits

The requirement on organisations with over 250 employees to report on their Gender Pay Gap (GPG) is starting to raise some interesting issues.  The latest amongst these is a survey carried out by BMG Research  for the Equalities and Human Rights Commission. Nearly two-thirds (61%) of women agreed that if their organisation had a gender pay gap it would make it more likely they would select an employer without a gap. And more than half (58%) agreed it would make them less likely to recommend their employer as a place to work.  More details in the chart below. It seems that those surveyed (men as well as women) were just…
Read More

Using our skills properly

How many times have you listened to or read dreary rhetoric about the need to up our skills level?  It is perfectly true that we don't give nearly enough respect, or money, to the less prestigious kinds of skills, notably those that are developed in the further rather than higher education sector.  But the important questions are around how well competences are actually used. This is, of course, the exact focus of the Paula Principle.  It's also the topic of a telling new report from the CIPD.  Here is its sweeping overall judgement (my stress):  The focus of skills policy over the last three decades has been almost exclusively on…
Read More

Chicken Behaviour and Collective Intelligence

I've just finished Robert Sapolsky's Behave: the biology of humans at our best and worst.  It's a massive book, covering the development of our brains and our behaviour from the moment of conception, set firmly in the context of long-run evolutionary trends.  The early parts were tough going for a scientific illiterate, notwithstanding Sapolsky's breezy humour,  but if you persevere there are huge numbers of plums in this rich pudding. Sapolsky's overall message is (and I quote), "It's complicated."   Life, development and behaviour are all a matter of a vast number of interactions that take place in a wide variety of contexts.  We may have learnt a lot, but at…
Read More

Speakers for schools, and caring

I do the occasional gig for Speakers for Schools.  This admirable organisation was started by Robert Peston. He kept being invited by private schools to give talks to their students, and felt that students in state schools should also have access to the kinds of insights that he and other public figures bring.  So SfS has built up a panel of people willing to go and talk at state schools, on whatever issues might help to enlarge students'  perspectives on life. I do not, of course, generate quite the buzz that I'm sure RP does, but I've enjoyed talking about the Paula Principle in a range of schools over the…
Read More

Working for free – a rugby player’s view

My eye was caught by a piece by Catherine Spencer in yesterday's Guardian.  Catherine is a former captain of the England women's rugby team, and author of a charmingly alliterative book Mud, Maul, Mascara.  She starts with the observation that men in the England rugby team are paid £25K per match, whilst their Japanese counterparts get barely enough to cover meagre subsistence costs. Catherine goes on to argue not against professional payments generally, but that the revenue generated by international matches should go back into the grassroots.  She says that it cannot be money that motivates people to want to play for their country - pointing out that the Japanese…
Read More

GPGs 1 and 2 – the gender pensions gap

One of the major implications of the Paula Principle is that it applies over the life course, so we need to estimate its effects over this full span.  GPG1 - the gender pay gap - leads inexorably to GPG2 - the gender pensions gap.  The gap is big, and it can last a very long time. I suppose technically a 'gap' requires men to be alive in order for their pensions to be compared with equivalent women, but women live longer and so even if their male peers are no longer there they suffer the effects of GPG2.  (I'm not ignoring the salience of differential longevities, but they aren't relevant…
Read More

Autumn Sonata

I went last night, as I often do on a Tuesday, to a gathering that is rapidly gaining a reputation as a North London institution - the Tufnell Park Film Club.  We sit in the upstairs room of the Lord Palmerston and watch a film, selected with the help of our two viddymasters, Nigel and Wayne. Last night's film was Autumn Sonata, Ingrid Bergman's last film, directed by her namesake Ingmar.  On the way there my friend Mark wondered just how bleak the film was going to be.  I had seen it some time ago, so risked an answer - wrongly so.  Seduced by the title, and the colouring of…
Read More

What does ‘closing the GPG’ actually mean?

I've been trying to get a handle on what kind of progress has been made in closing the gender pay gap, and this has led me to ask myself what 'closing the gap' actually means.  It seems to me that the obvious 'zero gap = equality = fairness' may disguise something important. The Paula Principle is about the due recognition of women's competences, and I'm mostly interested in career trajectories over time, ie what kinds of progression women make.  But pay is obviously the most available indicator, and the ONS has recently published some important data on trends over time on the GPG.  (By the way, I want to say 'chapeau'…
Read More

Collective intelligence

One of the of soft skills commonly touted as of growing importance for organisational success is the capacity to work successfully with others.  'Teamwork' is the most familiar label for this, but I think this sounds a little simplistic.  Brenda, one of my interviewees in The Paula Principle, put it this way: Women are interested in getting stuff done;  they hate game-playing and internal politicking; the only build networks if they see them as a genuine vehicle for getting things done, and not for personal advancement.  Their language is about 'we', about looking for complementary skills in a team, recognising that they themselves cannot do it all. I've just been reading Superminds by Thomas Malone.…
Read More

Productivity and the PP

Last month, global leaders from governments, private sector companies, trade unions and civil society pledged to take concrete action towards closing the gender pay gap by 2030. The global commitments – to ensure women in every sector of the workforce are paid equally to men for doing work of equal value – were made at the Equal Pay International Coalition (EPIC) Pledging event held during the United Nations General Assembly in New York. As part of the rationale for the initiative, Secretary-General of the OECD, Angel Gurría, said, “Gender pay gaps are not only unfair for those who suffer them, but they are also detrimental to our economies. If you do not have…
Read More

How a GPG deters potential recruits

The requirement on organisations with over 250 employees to report on their Gender Pay Gap (GPG) is starting to raise some interesting issues.  The latest amongst these is a survey carried out by BMG Research  for the Equalities and Human Rights Commission. Nearly two-thirds (61%) of women agreed that if their organisation had a gender pay gap it would make it more likely they would select an employer without a gap. And more than half (58%) agreed it would make them less likely to recommend their employer as a place to work.  More details in the chart below. It seems that those surveyed (men as well as women) were just…
Read More

Using our skills properly

How many times have you listened to or read dreary rhetoric about the need to up our skills level?  It is perfectly true that we don't give nearly enough respect, or money, to the less prestigious kinds of skills, notably those that are developed in the further rather than higher education sector.  But the important questions are around how well competences are actually used. This is, of course, the exact focus of the Paula Principle.  It's also the topic of a telling new report from the CIPD.  Here is its sweeping overall judgement (my stress):  The focus of skills policy over the last three decades has been almost exclusively on…
Read More

Chicken Behaviour and Collective Intelligence

I've just finished Robert Sapolsky's Behave: the biology of humans at our best and worst.  It's a massive book, covering the development of our brains and our behaviour from the moment of conception, set firmly in the context of long-run evolutionary trends.  The early parts were tough going for a scientific illiterate, notwithstanding Sapolsky's breezy humour,  but if you persevere there are huge numbers of plums in this rich pudding. Sapolsky's overall message is (and I quote), "It's complicated."   Life, development and behaviour are all a matter of a vast number of interactions that take place in a wide variety of contexts.  We may have learnt a lot, but at…
Read More

Speakers for schools, and caring

I do the occasional gig for Speakers for Schools.  This admirable organisation was started by Robert Peston. He kept being invited by private schools to give talks to their students, and felt that students in state schools should also have access to the kinds of insights that he and other public figures bring.  So SfS has built up a panel of people willing to go and talk at state schools, on whatever issues might help to enlarge students'  perspectives on life. I do not, of course, generate quite the buzz that I'm sure RP does, but I've enjoyed talking about the Paula Principle in a range of schools over the…
Read More

Working for free – a rugby player’s view

My eye was caught by a piece by Catherine Spencer in yesterday's Guardian.  Catherine is a former captain of the England women's rugby team, and author of a charmingly alliterative book Mud, Maul, Mascara.  She starts with the observation that men in the England rugby team are paid £25K per match, whilst their Japanese counterparts get barely enough to cover meagre subsistence costs. Catherine goes on to argue not against professional payments generally, but that the revenue generated by international matches should go back into the grassroots.  She says that it cannot be money that motivates people to want to play for their country - pointing out that the Japanese…
Read More

GPGs 1 and 2 – the gender pensions gap

One of the major implications of the Paula Principle is that it applies over the life course, so we need to estimate its effects over this full span.  GPG1 - the gender pay gap - leads inexorably to GPG2 - the gender pensions gap.  The gap is big, and it can last a very long time. I suppose technically a 'gap' requires men to be alive in order for their pensions to be compared with equivalent women, but women live longer and so even if their male peers are no longer there they suffer the effects of GPG2.  (I'm not ignoring the salience of differential longevities, but they aren't relevant…
Read More

Autumn Sonata

I went last night, as I often do on a Tuesday, to a gathering that is rapidly gaining a reputation as a North London institution - the Tufnell Park Film Club.  We sit in the upstairs room of the Lord Palmerston and watch a film, selected with the help of our two viddymasters, Nigel and Wayne. Last night's film was Autumn Sonata, Ingrid Bergman's last film, directed by her namesake Ingmar.  On the way there my friend Mark wondered just how bleak the film was going to be.  I had seen it some time ago, so risked an answer - wrongly so.  Seduced by the title, and the colouring of…
Read More

What does ‘closing the GPG’ actually mean?

I've been trying to get a handle on what kind of progress has been made in closing the gender pay gap, and this has led me to ask myself what 'closing the gap' actually means.  It seems to me that the obvious 'zero gap = equality = fairness' may disguise something important. The Paula Principle is about the due recognition of women's competences, and I'm mostly interested in career trajectories over time, ie what kinds of progression women make.  But pay is obviously the most available indicator, and the ONS has recently published some important data on trends over time on the GPG.  (By the way, I want to say 'chapeau'…
Read More

Collective intelligence

One of the of soft skills commonly touted as of growing importance for organisational success is the capacity to work successfully with others.  'Teamwork' is the most familiar label for this, but I think this sounds a little simplistic.  Brenda, one of my interviewees in The Paula Principle, put it this way: Women are interested in getting stuff done;  they hate game-playing and internal politicking; the only build networks if they see them as a genuine vehicle for getting things done, and not for personal advancement.  Their language is about 'we', about looking for complementary skills in a team, recognising that they themselves cannot do it all. I've just been reading Superminds by Thomas Malone.…
Read More

Productivity and the PP

Last month, global leaders from governments, private sector companies, trade unions and civil society pledged to take concrete action towards closing the gender pay gap by 2030. The global commitments – to ensure women in every sector of the workforce are paid equally to men for doing work of equal value – were made at the Equal Pay International Coalition (EPIC) Pledging event held during the United Nations General Assembly in New York. As part of the rationale for the initiative, Secretary-General of the OECD, Angel Gurría, said, “Gender pay gaps are not only unfair for those who suffer them, but they are also detrimental to our economies. If you do not have…
Read More

How a GPG deters potential recruits

The requirement on organisations with over 250 employees to report on their Gender Pay Gap (GPG) is starting to raise some interesting issues.  The latest amongst these is a survey carried out by BMG Research  for the Equalities and Human Rights Commission. Nearly two-thirds (61%) of women agreed that if their organisation had a gender pay gap it would make it more likely they would select an employer without a gap. And more than half (58%) agreed it would make them less likely to recommend their employer as a place to work.  More details in the chart below. It seems that those surveyed (men as well as women) were just…
Read More

Using our skills properly

How many times have you listened to or read dreary rhetoric about the need to up our skills level?  It is perfectly true that we don't give nearly enough respect, or money, to the less prestigious kinds of skills, notably those that are developed in the further rather than higher education sector.  But the important questions are around how well competences are actually used. This is, of course, the exact focus of the Paula Principle.  It's also the topic of a telling new report from the CIPD.  Here is its sweeping overall judgement (my stress):  The focus of skills policy over the last three decades has been almost exclusively on…
Read More

Chicken Behaviour and Collective Intelligence

I've just finished Robert Sapolsky's Behave: the biology of humans at our best and worst.  It's a massive book, covering the development of our brains and our behaviour from the moment of conception, set firmly in the context of long-run evolutionary trends.  The early parts were tough going for a scientific illiterate, notwithstanding Sapolsky's breezy humour,  but if you persevere there are huge numbers of plums in this rich pudding. Sapolsky's overall message is (and I quote), "It's complicated."   Life, development and behaviour are all a matter of a vast number of interactions that take place in a wide variety of contexts.  We may have learnt a lot, but at…
Read More

Speakers for schools, and caring

I do the occasional gig for Speakers for Schools.  This admirable organisation was started by Robert Peston. He kept being invited by private schools to give talks to their students, and felt that students in state schools should also have access to the kinds of insights that he and other public figures bring.  So SfS has built up a panel of people willing to go and talk at state schools, on whatever issues might help to enlarge students'  perspectives on life. I do not, of course, generate quite the buzz that I'm sure RP does, but I've enjoyed talking about the Paula Principle in a range of schools over the…
Read More

Working for free – a rugby player’s view

My eye was caught by a piece by Catherine Spencer in yesterday's Guardian.  Catherine is a former captain of the England women's rugby team, and author of a charmingly alliterative book Mud, Maul, Mascara.  She starts with the observation that men in the England rugby team are paid £25K per match, whilst their Japanese counterparts get barely enough to cover meagre subsistence costs. Catherine goes on to argue not against professional payments generally, but that the revenue generated by international matches should go back into the grassroots.  She says that it cannot be money that motivates people to want to play for their country - pointing out that the Japanese…
Read More

GPGs 1 and 2 – the gender pensions gap

One of the major implications of the Paula Principle is that it applies over the life course, so we need to estimate its effects over this full span.  GPG1 - the gender pay gap - leads inexorably to GPG2 - the gender pensions gap.  The gap is big, and it can last a very long time. I suppose technically a 'gap' requires men to be alive in order for their pensions to be compared with equivalent women, but women live longer and so even if their male peers are no longer there they suffer the effects of GPG2.  (I'm not ignoring the salience of differential longevities, but they aren't relevant…
Read More

Autumn Sonata

I went last night, as I often do on a Tuesday, to a gathering that is rapidly gaining a reputation as a North London institution - the Tufnell Park Film Club.  We sit in the upstairs room of the Lord Palmerston and watch a film, selected with the help of our two viddymasters, Nigel and Wayne. Last night's film was Autumn Sonata, Ingrid Bergman's last film, directed by her namesake Ingmar.  On the way there my friend Mark wondered just how bleak the film was going to be.  I had seen it some time ago, so risked an answer - wrongly so.  Seduced by the title, and the colouring of…
Read More

What does ‘closing the GPG’ actually mean?

I've been trying to get a handle on what kind of progress has been made in closing the gender pay gap, and this has led me to ask myself what 'closing the gap' actually means.  It seems to me that the obvious 'zero gap = equality = fairness' may disguise something important. The Paula Principle is about the due recognition of women's competences, and I'm mostly interested in career trajectories over time, ie what kinds of progression women make.  But pay is obviously the most available indicator, and the ONS has recently published some important data on trends over time on the GPG.  (By the way, I want to say 'chapeau'…
Read More

Collective intelligence

One of the of soft skills commonly touted as of growing importance for organisational success is the capacity to work successfully with others.  'Teamwork' is the most familiar label for this, but I think this sounds a little simplistic.  Brenda, one of my interviewees in The Paula Principle, put it this way: Women are interested in getting stuff done;  they hate game-playing and internal politicking; the only build networks if they see them as a genuine vehicle for getting things done, and not for personal advancement.  Their language is about 'we', about looking for complementary skills in a team, recognising that they themselves cannot do it all. I've just been reading Superminds by Thomas Malone.…
Read More

Productivity and the PP

Last month, global leaders from governments, private sector companies, trade unions and civil society pledged to take concrete action towards closing the gender pay gap by 2030. The global commitments – to ensure women in every sector of the workforce are paid equally to men for doing work of equal value – were made at the Equal Pay International Coalition (EPIC) Pledging event held during the United Nations General Assembly in New York. As part of the rationale for the initiative, Secretary-General of the OECD, Angel Gurría, said, “Gender pay gaps are not only unfair for those who suffer them, but they are also detrimental to our economies. If you do not have…
Read More

How a GPG deters potential recruits

The requirement on organisations with over 250 employees to report on their Gender Pay Gap (GPG) is starting to raise some interesting issues.  The latest amongst these is a survey carried out by BMG Research  for the Equalities and Human Rights Commission. Nearly two-thirds (61%) of women agreed that if their organisation had a gender pay gap it would make it more likely they would select an employer without a gap. And more than half (58%) agreed it would make them less likely to recommend their employer as a place to work.  More details in the chart below. It seems that those surveyed (men as well as women) were just…
Read More

Using our skills properly

How many times have you listened to or read dreary rhetoric about the need to up our skills level?  It is perfectly true that we don't give nearly enough respect, or money, to the less prestigious kinds of skills, notably those that are developed in the further rather than higher education sector.  But the important questions are around how well competences are actually used. This is, of course, the exact focus of the Paula Principle.  It's also the topic of a telling new report from the CIPD.  Here is its sweeping overall judgement (my stress):  The focus of skills policy over the last three decades has been almost exclusively on…
Read More

Chicken Behaviour and Collective Intelligence

I've just finished Robert Sapolsky's Behave: the biology of humans at our best and worst.  It's a massive book, covering the development of our brains and our behaviour from the moment of conception, set firmly in the context of long-run evolutionary trends.  The early parts were tough going for a scientific illiterate, notwithstanding Sapolsky's breezy humour,  but if you persevere there are huge numbers of plums in this rich pudding. Sapolsky's overall message is (and I quote), "It's complicated."   Life, development and behaviour are all a matter of a vast number of interactions that take place in a wide variety of contexts.  We may have learnt a lot, but at…
Read More

Speakers for schools, and caring

I do the occasional gig for Speakers for Schools.  This admirable organisation was started by Robert Peston. He kept being invited by private schools to give talks to their students, and felt that students in state schools should also have access to the kinds of insights that he and other public figures bring.  So SfS has built up a panel of people willing to go and talk at state schools, on whatever issues might help to enlarge students'  perspectives on life. I do not, of course, generate quite the buzz that I'm sure RP does, but I've enjoyed talking about the Paula Principle in a range of schools over the…
Read More

Working for free – a rugby player’s view

My eye was caught by a piece by Catherine Spencer in yesterday's Guardian.  Catherine is a former captain of the England women's rugby team, and author of a charmingly alliterative book Mud, Maul, Mascara.  She starts with the observation that men in the England rugby team are paid £25K per match, whilst their Japanese counterparts get barely enough to cover meagre subsistence costs. Catherine goes on to argue not against professional payments generally, but that the revenue generated by international matches should go back into the grassroots.  She says that it cannot be money that motivates people to want to play for their country - pointing out that the Japanese…
Read More

GPGs 1 and 2 – the gender pensions gap

One of the major implications of the Paula Principle is that it applies over the life course, so we need to estimate its effects over this full span.  GPG1 - the gender pay gap - leads inexorably to GPG2 - the gender pensions gap.  The gap is big, and it can last a very long time. I suppose technically a 'gap' requires men to be alive in order for their pensions to be compared with equivalent women, but women live longer and so even if their male peers are no longer there they suffer the effects of GPG2.  (I'm not ignoring the salience of differential longevities, but they aren't relevant…
Read More

Autumn Sonata

I went last night, as I often do on a Tuesday, to a gathering that is rapidly gaining a reputation as a North London institution - the Tufnell Park Film Club.  We sit in the upstairs room of the Lord Palmerston and watch a film, selected with the help of our two viddymasters, Nigel and Wayne. Last night's film was Autumn Sonata, Ingrid Bergman's last film, directed by her namesake Ingmar.  On the way there my friend Mark wondered just how bleak the film was going to be.  I had seen it some time ago, so risked an answer - wrongly so.  Seduced by the title, and the colouring of…
Read More

What does ‘closing the GPG’ actually mean?

I've been trying to get a handle on what kind of progress has been made in closing the gender pay gap, and this has led me to ask myself what 'closing the gap' actually means.  It seems to me that the obvious 'zero gap = equality = fairness' may disguise something important. The Paula Principle is about the due recognition of women's competences, and I'm mostly interested in career trajectories over time, ie what kinds of progression women make.  But pay is obviously the most available indicator, and the ONS has recently published some important data on trends over time on the GPG.  (By the way, I want to say 'chapeau'…
Read More

Collective intelligence

One of the of soft skills commonly touted as of growing importance for organisational success is the capacity to work successfully with others.  'Teamwork' is the most familiar label for this, but I think this sounds a little simplistic.  Brenda, one of my interviewees in The Paula Principle, put it this way: Women are interested in getting stuff done;  they hate game-playing and internal politicking; the only build networks if they see them as a genuine vehicle for getting things done, and not for personal advancement.  Their language is about 'we', about looking for complementary skills in a team, recognising that they themselves cannot do it all. I've just been reading Superminds by Thomas Malone.…
Read More

Productivity and the PP

Last month, global leaders from governments, private sector companies, trade unions and civil society pledged to take concrete action towards closing the gender pay gap by 2030. The global commitments – to ensure women in every sector of the workforce are paid equally to men for doing work of equal value – were made at the Equal Pay International Coalition (EPIC) Pledging event held during the United Nations General Assembly in New York. As part of the rationale for the initiative, Secretary-General of the OECD, Angel Gurría, said, “Gender pay gaps are not only unfair for those who suffer them, but they are also detrimental to our economies. If you do not have…
Read More

How a GPG deters potential recruits

The requirement on organisations with over 250 employees to report on their Gender Pay Gap (GPG) is starting to raise some interesting issues.  The latest amongst these is a survey carried out by BMG Research  for the Equalities and Human Rights Commission. Nearly two-thirds (61%) of women agreed that if their organisation had a gender pay gap it would make it more likely they would select an employer without a gap. And more than half (58%) agreed it would make them less likely to recommend their employer as a place to work.  More details in the chart below. It seems that those surveyed (men as well as women) were just…
Read More

Using our skills properly

How many times have you listened to or read dreary rhetoric about the need to up our skills level?  It is perfectly true that we don't give nearly enough respect, or money, to the less prestigious kinds of skills, notably those that are developed in the further rather than higher education sector.  But the important questions are around how well competences are actually used. This is, of course, the exact focus of the Paula Principle.  It's also the topic of a telling new report from the CIPD.  Here is its sweeping overall judgement (my stress):  The focus of skills policy over the last three decades has been almost exclusively on…
Read More

Chicken Behaviour and Collective Intelligence

I've just finished Robert Sapolsky's Behave: the biology of humans at our best and worst.  It's a massive book, covering the development of our brains and our behaviour from the moment of conception, set firmly in the context of long-run evolutionary trends.  The early parts were tough going for a scientific illiterate, notwithstanding Sapolsky's breezy humour,  but if you persevere there are huge numbers of plums in this rich pudding. Sapolsky's overall message is (and I quote), "It's complicated."   Life, development and behaviour are all a matter of a vast number of interactions that take place in a wide variety of contexts.  We may have learnt a lot, but at…
Read More

Speakers for schools, and caring

I do the occasional gig for Speakers for Schools.  This admirable organisation was started by Robert Peston. He kept being invited by private schools to give talks to their students, and felt that students in state schools should also have access to the kinds of insights that he and other public figures bring.  So SfS has built up a panel of people willing to go and talk at state schools, on whatever issues might help to enlarge students'  perspectives on life. I do not, of course, generate quite the buzz that I'm sure RP does, but I've enjoyed talking about the Paula Principle in a range of schools over the…
Read More

Working for free – a rugby player’s view

My eye was caught by a piece by Catherine Spencer in yesterday's Guardian.  Catherine is a former captain of the England women's rugby team, and author of a charmingly alliterative book Mud, Maul, Mascara.  She starts with the observation that men in the England rugby team are paid £25K per match, whilst their Japanese counterparts get barely enough to cover meagre subsistence costs. Catherine goes on to argue not against professional payments generally, but that the revenue generated by international matches should go back into the grassroots.  She says that it cannot be money that motivates people to want to play for their country - pointing out that the Japanese…
Read More

GPGs 1 and 2 – the gender pensions gap

One of the major implications of the Paula Principle is that it applies over the life course, so we need to estimate its effects over this full span.  GPG1 - the gender pay gap - leads inexorably to GPG2 - the gender pensions gap.  The gap is big, and it can last a very long time. I suppose technically a 'gap' requires men to be alive in order for their pensions to be compared with equivalent women, but women live longer and so even if their male peers are no longer there they suffer the effects of GPG2.  (I'm not ignoring the salience of differential longevities, but they aren't relevant…
Read More

Autumn Sonata

I went last night, as I often do on a Tuesday, to a gathering that is rapidly gaining a reputation as a North London institution - the Tufnell Park Film Club.  We sit in the upstairs room of the Lord Palmerston and watch a film, selected with the help of our two viddymasters, Nigel and Wayne. Last night's film was Autumn Sonata, Ingrid Bergman's last film, directed by her namesake Ingmar.  On the way there my friend Mark wondered just how bleak the film was going to be.  I had seen it some time ago, so risked an answer - wrongly so.  Seduced by the title, and the colouring of…
Read More

What does ‘closing the GPG’ actually mean?

I've been trying to get a handle on what kind of progress has been made in closing the gender pay gap, and this has led me to ask myself what 'closing the gap' actually means.  It seems to me that the obvious 'zero gap = equality = fairness' may disguise something important. The Paula Principle is about the due recognition of women's competences, and I'm mostly interested in career trajectories over time, ie what kinds of progression women make.  But pay is obviously the most available indicator, and the ONS has recently published some important data on trends over time on the GPG.  (By the way, I want to say 'chapeau'…
Read More

Collective intelligence

One of the of soft skills commonly touted as of growing importance for organisational success is the capacity to work successfully with others.  'Teamwork' is the most familiar label for this, but I think this sounds a little simplistic.  Brenda, one of my interviewees in The Paula Principle, put it this way: Women are interested in getting stuff done;  they hate game-playing and internal politicking; the only build networks if they see them as a genuine vehicle for getting things done, and not for personal advancement.  Their language is about 'we', about looking for complementary skills in a team, recognising that they themselves cannot do it all. I've just been reading Superminds by Thomas Malone.…
Read More

Productivity and the PP

Last month, global leaders from governments, private sector companies, trade unions and civil society pledged to take concrete action towards closing the gender pay gap by 2030. The global commitments – to ensure women in every sector of the workforce are paid equally to men for doing work of equal value – were made at the Equal Pay International Coalition (EPIC) Pledging event held during the United Nations General Assembly in New York. As part of the rationale for the initiative, Secretary-General of the OECD, Angel Gurría, said, “Gender pay gaps are not only unfair for those who suffer them, but they are also detrimental to our economies. If you do not have…
Read More

How a GPG deters potential recruits

The requirement on organisations with over 250 employees to report on their Gender Pay Gap (GPG) is starting to raise some interesting issues.  The latest amongst these is a survey carried out by BMG Research  for the Equalities and Human Rights Commission. Nearly two-thirds (61%) of women agreed that if their organisation had a gender pay gap it would make it more likely they would select an employer without a gap. And more than half (58%) agreed it would make them less likely to recommend their employer as a place to work.  More details in the chart below. It seems that those surveyed (men as well as women) were just…
Read More

Using our skills properly

How many times have you listened to or read dreary rhetoric about the need to up our skills level?  It is perfectly true that we don't give nearly enough respect, or money, to the less prestigious kinds of skills, notably those that are developed in the further rather than higher education sector.  But the important questions are around how well competences are actually used. This is, of course, the exact focus of the Paula Principle.  It's also the topic of a telling new report from the CIPD.  Here is its sweeping overall judgement (my stress):  The focus of skills policy over the last three decades has been almost exclusively on…
Read More

Chicken Behaviour and Collective Intelligence

I've just finished Robert Sapolsky's Behave: the biology of humans at our best and worst.  It's a massive book, covering the development of our brains and our behaviour from the moment of conception, set firmly in the context of long-run evolutionary trends.  The early parts were tough going for a scientific illiterate, notwithstanding Sapolsky's breezy humour,  but if you persevere there are huge numbers of plums in this rich pudding. Sapolsky's overall message is (and I quote), "It's complicated."   Life, development and behaviour are all a matter of a vast number of interactions that take place in a wide variety of contexts.  We may have learnt a lot, but at…
Read More

Speakers for schools, and caring

I do the occasional gig for Speakers for Schools.  This admirable organisation was started by Robert Peston. He kept being invited by private schools to give talks to their students, and felt that students in state schools should also have access to the kinds of insights that he and other public figures bring.  So SfS has built up a panel of people willing to go and talk at state schools, on whatever issues might help to enlarge students'  perspectives on life. I do not, of course, generate quite the buzz that I'm sure RP does, but I've enjoyed talking about the Paula Principle in a range of schools over the…
Read More

Working for free – a rugby player’s view

My eye was caught by a piece by Catherine Spencer in yesterday's Guardian.  Catherine is a former captain of the England women's rugby team, and author of a charmingly alliterative book Mud, Maul, Mascara.  She starts with the observation that men in the England rugby team are paid £25K per match, whilst their Japanese counterparts get barely enough to cover meagre subsistence costs. Catherine goes on to argue not against professional payments generally, but that the revenue generated by international matches should go back into the grassroots.  She says that it cannot be money that motivates people to want to play for their country - pointing out that the Japanese…
Read More

GPGs 1 and 2 – the gender pensions gap

One of the major implications of the Paula Principle is that it applies over the life course, so we need to estimate its effects over this full span.  GPG1 - the gender pay gap - leads inexorably to GPG2 - the gender pensions gap.  The gap is big, and it can last a very long time. I suppose technically a 'gap' requires men to be alive in order for their pensions to be compared with equivalent women, but women live longer and so even if their male peers are no longer there they suffer the effects of GPG2.  (I'm not ignoring the salience of differential longevities, but they aren't relevant…
Read More

Autumn Sonata

I went last night, as I often do on a Tuesday, to a gathering that is rapidly gaining a reputation as a North London institution - the Tufnell Park Film Club.  We sit in the upstairs room of the Lord Palmerston and watch a film, selected with the help of our two viddymasters, Nigel and Wayne. Last night's film was Autumn Sonata, Ingrid Bergman's last film, directed by her namesake Ingmar.  On the way there my friend Mark wondered just how bleak the film was going to be.  I had seen it some time ago, so risked an answer - wrongly so.  Seduced by the title, and the colouring of…
Read More

What does ‘closing the GPG’ actually mean?

I've been trying to get a handle on what kind of progress has been made in closing the gender pay gap, and this has led me to ask myself what 'closing the gap' actually means.  It seems to me that the obvious 'zero gap = equality = fairness' may disguise something important. The Paula Principle is about the due recognition of women's competences, and I'm mostly interested in career trajectories over time, ie what kinds of progression women make.  But pay is obviously the most available indicator, and the ONS has recently published some important data on trends over time on the GPG.  (By the way, I want to say 'chapeau'…
Read More

Collective intelligence

One of the of soft skills commonly touted as of growing importance for organisational success is the capacity to work successfully with others.  'Teamwork' is the most familiar label for this, but I think this sounds a little simplistic.  Brenda, one of my interviewees in The Paula Principle, put it this way: Women are interested in getting stuff done;  they hate game-playing and internal politicking; the only build networks if they see them as a genuine vehicle for getting things done, and not for personal advancement.  Their language is about 'we', about looking for complementary skills in a team, recognising that they themselves cannot do it all. I've just been reading Superminds by Thomas Malone.…
Read More

Productivity and the PP

Last month, global leaders from governments, private sector companies, trade unions and civil society pledged to take concrete action towards closing the gender pay gap by 2030. The global commitments – to ensure women in every sector of the workforce are paid equally to men for doing work of equal value – were made at the Equal Pay International Coalition (EPIC) Pledging event held during the United Nations General Assembly in New York. As part of the rationale for the initiative, Secretary-General of the OECD, Angel Gurría, said, “Gender pay gaps are not only unfair for those who suffer them, but they are also detrimental to our economies. If you do not have…
Read More

How a GPG deters potential recruits

The requirement on organisations with over 250 employees to report on their Gender Pay Gap (GPG) is starting to raise some interesting issues.  The latest amongst these is a survey carried out by BMG Research  for the Equalities and Human Rights Commission. Nearly two-thirds (61%) of women agreed that if their organisation had a gender pay gap it would make it more likely they would select an employer without a gap. And more than half (58%) agreed it would make them less likely to recommend their employer as a place to work.  More details in the chart below. It seems that those surveyed (men as well as women) were just…
Read More

Using our skills properly

How many times have you listened to or read dreary rhetoric about the need to up our skills level?  It is perfectly true that we don't give nearly enough respect, or money, to the less prestigious kinds of skills, notably those that are developed in the further rather than higher education sector.  But the important questions are around how well competences are actually used. This is, of course, the exact focus of the Paula Principle.  It's also the topic of a telling new report from the CIPD.  Here is its sweeping overall judgement (my stress):  The focus of skills policy over the last three decades has been almost exclusively on…
Read More

Chicken Behaviour and Collective Intelligence

I've just finished Robert Sapolsky's Behave: the biology of humans at our best and worst.  It's a massive book, covering the development of our brains and our behaviour from the moment of conception, set firmly in the context of long-run evolutionary trends.  The early parts were tough going for a scientific illiterate, notwithstanding Sapolsky's breezy humour,  but if you persevere there are huge numbers of plums in this rich pudding. Sapolsky's overall message is (and I quote), "It's complicated."   Life, development and behaviour are all a matter of a vast number of interactions that take place in a wide variety of contexts.  We may have learnt a lot, but at…
Read More

Speakers for schools, and caring

I do the occasional gig for Speakers for Schools.  This admirable organisation was started by Robert Peston. He kept being invited by private schools to give talks to their students, and felt that students in state schools should also have access to the kinds of insights that he and other public figures bring.  So SfS has built up a panel of people willing to go and talk at state schools, on whatever issues might help to enlarge students'  perspectives on life. I do not, of course, generate quite the buzz that I'm sure RP does, but I've enjoyed talking about the Paula Principle in a range of schools over the…
Read More

Working for free – a rugby player’s view

My eye was caught by a piece by Catherine Spencer in yesterday's Guardian.  Catherine is a former captain of the England women's rugby team, and author of a charmingly alliterative book Mud, Maul, Mascara.  She starts with the observation that men in the England rugby team are paid £25K per match, whilst their Japanese counterparts get barely enough to cover meagre subsistence costs. Catherine goes on to argue not against professional payments generally, but that the revenue generated by international matches should go back into the grassroots.  She says that it cannot be money that motivates people to want to play for their country - pointing out that the Japanese…
Read More

GPGs 1 and 2 – the gender pensions gap

One of the major implications of the Paula Principle is that it applies over the life course, so we need to estimate its effects over this full span.  GPG1 - the gender pay gap - leads inexorably to GPG2 - the gender pensions gap.  The gap is big, and it can last a very long time. I suppose technically a 'gap' requires men to be alive in order for their pensions to be compared with equivalent women, but women live longer and so even if their male peers are no longer there they suffer the effects of GPG2.  (I'm not ignoring the salience of differential longevities, but they aren't relevant…
Read More

Autumn Sonata

I went last night, as I often do on a Tuesday, to a gathering that is rapidly gaining a reputation as a North London institution - the Tufnell Park Film Club.  We sit in the upstairs room of the Lord Palmerston and watch a film, selected with the help of our two viddymasters, Nigel and Wayne. Last night's film was Autumn Sonata, Ingrid Bergman's last film, directed by her namesake Ingmar.  On the way there my friend Mark wondered just how bleak the film was going to be.  I had seen it some time ago, so risked an answer - wrongly so.  Seduced by the title, and the colouring of…
Read More

What does ‘closing the GPG’ actually mean?

I've been trying to get a handle on what kind of progress has been made in closing the gender pay gap, and this has led me to ask myself what 'closing the gap' actually means.  It seems to me that the obvious 'zero gap = equality = fairness' may disguise something important. The Paula Principle is about the due recognition of women's competences, and I'm mostly interested in career trajectories over time, ie what kinds of progression women make.  But pay is obviously the most available indicator, and the ONS has recently published some important data on trends over time on the GPG.  (By the way, I want to say 'chapeau'…
Read More

Collective intelligence

One of the of soft skills commonly touted as of growing importance for organisational success is the capacity to work successfully with others.  'Teamwork' is the most familiar label for this, but I think this sounds a little simplistic.  Brenda, one of my interviewees in The Paula Principle, put it this way: Women are interested in getting stuff done;  they hate game-playing and internal politicking; the only build networks if they see them as a genuine vehicle for getting things done, and not for personal advancement.  Their language is about 'we', about looking for complementary skills in a team, recognising that they themselves cannot do it all. I've just been reading Superminds by Thomas Malone.…
Read More

Productivity and the PP

Last month, global leaders from governments, private sector companies, trade unions and civil society pledged to take concrete action towards closing the gender pay gap by 2030. The global commitments – to ensure women in every sector of the workforce are paid equally to men for doing work of equal value – were made at the Equal Pay International Coalition (EPIC) Pledging event held during the United Nations General Assembly in New York. As part of the rationale for the initiative, Secretary-General of the OECD, Angel Gurría, said, “Gender pay gaps are not only unfair for those who suffer them, but they are also detrimental to our economies. If you do not have…
Read More

How a GPG deters potential recruits

The requirement on organisations with over 250 employees to report on their Gender Pay Gap (GPG) is starting to raise some interesting issues.  The latest amongst these is a survey carried out by BMG Research  for the Equalities and Human Rights Commission. Nearly two-thirds (61%) of women agreed that if their organisation had a gender pay gap it would make it more likely they would select an employer without a gap. And more than half (58%) agreed it would make them less likely to recommend their employer as a place to work.  More details in the chart below. It seems that those surveyed (men as well as women) were just…
Read More

Using our skills properly

How many times have you listened to or read dreary rhetoric about the need to up our skills level?  It is perfectly true that we don't give nearly enough respect, or money, to the less prestigious kinds of skills, notably those that are developed in the further rather than higher education sector.  But the important questions are around how well competences are actually used. This is, of course, the exact focus of the Paula Principle.  It's also the topic of a telling new report from the CIPD.  Here is its sweeping overall judgement (my stress):  The focus of skills policy over the last three decades has been almost exclusively on…
Read More