The Paula Principle

Finance Curse and Brain Drain

A couple of days ago I took part in a webinar organised by the admirable Transparency Task Force. The TTF promotes reform of our dubiously accountable finance sector. The speaker on this occasion was Nicholas Shaxson. I'd read and enjoyed his exposé of tax havens, Treasure Islands, some years ago. I'd also read and been impressed by his more recent The Finance Curse, which argues that the UK suffers from its overdeveloped finance sector just as other countries have suffered from over-reliance on a natural resource such as oil. Of course we need banks and financial institutions. They enable businesses to start up and grow, and individuals to use their…
Read More

IWD: time to restart

Yesterday was International Women's Day, and I thought this was the time to get going again on the PP blog, which I've neglected for months. Technology dictated otherwise, so I'm a day late... We had the usual surge of impressive stats underlining the issues still impeding progress towards equality at work. I want to focus on just three of these. The first is the way the GPG expands hugely over the life cycle. The TUC's excellent annual report shows this so clearly: This is very familiar. But in recognising how this age profile has persisted over the years we need to remember that the qualifications profile by age has changed.…
Read More

University entrance: gender, poverty and ethnicity

In the Paula Principle book I gave only a little space to ethnic variations in the gender gap -partly because I'm no expert on ethnicity and partly because I didn't want to overload the book with figures. A recent report in The Times looks at statistics from the Department for Education on university entrance, paying particular attention to those students who were on free school meals - the standard indicator of poverty. The ethnic variations are striking; the common factor is that girls do better than boys. At one end no fewer than 75% of Chinese girls getting free school meals went to university, 10 points ahead of Chinese boys.…
Read More

Women on Boards: a classical comparison

A recent piece in Social Europe took me back to my initial education. I spent many -probably too many - years a student of Latin and Greek literature and history. Very occasionally we were asked to think about the cultural and political differences between the two supposed wellsprings of European civilisation, though at the time - we're talking several decades ago - this would generally have been seen as too broad and unmanageable a question, ie not amenable to the narrow disciplinary boundaries which operated at the time. Now along comes a study which does just that - but in relation to women's representation at board level today. Audrey Latura…
Read More

Networking: PP4 and research success

I was very intrigued by Sarah Reardon‘s piece in Nature, on now networks influence women’s success in science.  It was tweeted by Athene Donald, who knows a thing or two herself about networking and science, and whose valuable tweets I've followed for sometime . The piece is a powerful illustration of Paula Principle factor 4, the influence of vertical networks.  It took me back, almost nostalgically, to the turn of the century when with John Field and others I was directly engaged in promoting the notion of social capital as a useful tool of analysis.  The unsurprising finding is how often women working in scientific teams have found their contributions ignored or unrecognised.  The more contentious issue arising…
Read More

The GEI and a presentation puzzle

Yesterday was International Women's Day, so the airwaves were humming with news, reminders of where there has been some/no progress, encouragements and disappointments. In the spirit of international exchanges I thought I'd just focus on one source of comparative information which relates to my recurrent theme of the under-recognition of women's competences. The EU's Gender Equality Index was flagged up by Laeticia Thissen in her excellent Social Europe piece. It covers the domains you'd expect: work, money, power, health, time and knowledge, and is a trove of . The indices inevitably give only a broad and partial picture but the data provides a great platform for identifying where more needs…
Read More

Wellbeing and careers: OECD work on social performance

There's quite a debate brewing on how we should think of companies: are they purely economic entities that should not deviate from their goal of financial 'efficiency' and answer only to their shareholders (of course within legal limits); or are they social units which have a wider set of 'stakeholders' - their employees, local communities, society as a whole? I was intrigued to come across a recent OECD publication which suggests that the OECD is firmly in the latter camp. The Policy Brief based on a longer Working Paper, is on Measuring the Social Performance of Firms through the Lens of the OECD Well-being Framework, and makes a substantial contribution…
Read More

Mea culpa: how the PP neglected age

Increasingly I'm having to accept that in the Paula Principle book I left out a major angle, namely the way the PP operates over the full adult life, and not merely at work. I'm now working on a book on how to model the life course as a whole, and so have become sensitised to the way in which inequalities at work affect the (increasingly long) periods people have after they finish paid work. But I should certainly have paid it more attention when thinking then about the PP. The most recent prompt came from a piece by the FT journalist Claer Barrett. Her always interesting contributions to the weekend…
Read More

Extreme PP: the Korean case

When I wrote the PP book, now nearly five years ago, South Korea was already the extreme example of the Paula Principle. On the education side young Korean women had shot up the OECD table of tertiary level achievement; but at work their qualifications gained little recognition, and the gender pay gap remained one of the biggest. A startling article from the New York Times reports on a wave of anti-feminism. Young male Koreans are turning their anger on women, who they see as depriving them of their life chances - in spite of the evidence that in their country above almost every other young women are unable to convert…
Read More

It’s sooo slooow: IFS on closing the GPG

The Institute for Fiscal Studies is running a massive study on inequality, funded by the Nuffield Foundation under the guidance of Nobel prizewinner Angus Deaton. The review will run for some time; its scope is admirably ambitious, covering themes such as family, employment, attitudes to inequality, tax, trade and several others. It is already a huge source of policy-relevant information, and promises to be a landmark. Naturally gender figures widely in the review as a whole, and the latest report, by Alison Andrew and colleagues, deals with gender inequality at work. It is called 'The more things change the more they stay the same'. The title is suitably wry; it…
Read More

Finance Curse and Brain Drain

A couple of days ago I took part in a webinar organised by the admirable Transparency Task Force. The TTF promotes reform of our dubiously accountable finance sector. The speaker on this occasion was Nicholas Shaxson. I'd read and enjoyed his exposé of tax havens, Treasure Islands, some years ago. I'd also read and been impressed by his more recent The Finance Curse, which argues that the UK suffers from its overdeveloped finance sector just as other countries have suffered from over-reliance on a natural resource such as oil. Of course we need banks and financial institutions. They enable businesses to start up and grow, and individuals to use their…
Read More

IWD: time to restart

Yesterday was International Women's Day, and I thought this was the time to get going again on the PP blog, which I've neglected for months. Technology dictated otherwise, so I'm a day late... We had the usual surge of impressive stats underlining the issues still impeding progress towards equality at work. I want to focus on just three of these. The first is the way the GPG expands hugely over the life cycle. The TUC's excellent annual report shows this so clearly: This is very familiar. But in recognising how this age profile has persisted over the years we need to remember that the qualifications profile by age has changed.…
Read More

University entrance: gender, poverty and ethnicity

In the Paula Principle book I gave only a little space to ethnic variations in the gender gap -partly because I'm no expert on ethnicity and partly because I didn't want to overload the book with figures. A recent report in The Times looks at statistics from the Department for Education on university entrance, paying particular attention to those students who were on free school meals - the standard indicator of poverty. The ethnic variations are striking; the common factor is that girls do better than boys. At one end no fewer than 75% of Chinese girls getting free school meals went to university, 10 points ahead of Chinese boys.…
Read More

Women on Boards: a classical comparison

A recent piece in Social Europe took me back to my initial education. I spent many -probably too many - years a student of Latin and Greek literature and history. Very occasionally we were asked to think about the cultural and political differences between the two supposed wellsprings of European civilisation, though at the time - we're talking several decades ago - this would generally have been seen as too broad and unmanageable a question, ie not amenable to the narrow disciplinary boundaries which operated at the time. Now along comes a study which does just that - but in relation to women's representation at board level today. Audrey Latura…
Read More

Networking: PP4 and research success

I was very intrigued by Sarah Reardon‘s piece in Nature, on now networks influence women’s success in science.  It was tweeted by Athene Donald, who knows a thing or two herself about networking and science, and whose valuable tweets I've followed for sometime . The piece is a powerful illustration of Paula Principle factor 4, the influence of vertical networks.  It took me back, almost nostalgically, to the turn of the century when with John Field and others I was directly engaged in promoting the notion of social capital as a useful tool of analysis.  The unsurprising finding is how often women working in scientific teams have found their contributions ignored or unrecognised.  The more contentious issue arising…
Read More

The GEI and a presentation puzzle

Yesterday was International Women's Day, so the airwaves were humming with news, reminders of where there has been some/no progress, encouragements and disappointments. In the spirit of international exchanges I thought I'd just focus on one source of comparative information which relates to my recurrent theme of the under-recognition of women's competences. The EU's Gender Equality Index was flagged up by Laeticia Thissen in her excellent Social Europe piece. It covers the domains you'd expect: work, money, power, health, time and knowledge, and is a trove of . The indices inevitably give only a broad and partial picture but the data provides a great platform for identifying where more needs…
Read More

Wellbeing and careers: OECD work on social performance

There's quite a debate brewing on how we should think of companies: are they purely economic entities that should not deviate from their goal of financial 'efficiency' and answer only to their shareholders (of course within legal limits); or are they social units which have a wider set of 'stakeholders' - their employees, local communities, society as a whole? I was intrigued to come across a recent OECD publication which suggests that the OECD is firmly in the latter camp. The Policy Brief based on a longer Working Paper, is on Measuring the Social Performance of Firms through the Lens of the OECD Well-being Framework, and makes a substantial contribution…
Read More

Mea culpa: how the PP neglected age

Increasingly I'm having to accept that in the Paula Principle book I left out a major angle, namely the way the PP operates over the full adult life, and not merely at work. I'm now working on a book on how to model the life course as a whole, and so have become sensitised to the way in which inequalities at work affect the (increasingly long) periods people have after they finish paid work. But I should certainly have paid it more attention when thinking then about the PP. The most recent prompt came from a piece by the FT journalist Claer Barrett. Her always interesting contributions to the weekend…
Read More

Extreme PP: the Korean case

When I wrote the PP book, now nearly five years ago, South Korea was already the extreme example of the Paula Principle. On the education side young Korean women had shot up the OECD table of tertiary level achievement; but at work their qualifications gained little recognition, and the gender pay gap remained one of the biggest. A startling article from the New York Times reports on a wave of anti-feminism. Young male Koreans are turning their anger on women, who they see as depriving them of their life chances - in spite of the evidence that in their country above almost every other young women are unable to convert…
Read More

It’s sooo slooow: IFS on closing the GPG

The Institute for Fiscal Studies is running a massive study on inequality, funded by the Nuffield Foundation under the guidance of Nobel prizewinner Angus Deaton. The review will run for some time; its scope is admirably ambitious, covering themes such as family, employment, attitudes to inequality, tax, trade and several others. It is already a huge source of policy-relevant information, and promises to be a landmark. Naturally gender figures widely in the review as a whole, and the latest report, by Alison Andrew and colleagues, deals with gender inequality at work. It is called 'The more things change the more they stay the same'. The title is suitably wry; it…
Read More

Finance Curse and Brain Drain

A couple of days ago I took part in a webinar organised by the admirable Transparency Task Force. The TTF promotes reform of our dubiously accountable finance sector. The speaker on this occasion was Nicholas Shaxson. I'd read and enjoyed his exposé of tax havens, Treasure Islands, some years ago. I'd also read and been impressed by his more recent The Finance Curse, which argues that the UK suffers from its overdeveloped finance sector just as other countries have suffered from over-reliance on a natural resource such as oil. Of course we need banks and financial institutions. They enable businesses to start up and grow, and individuals to use their…
Read More

IWD: time to restart

Yesterday was International Women's Day, and I thought this was the time to get going again on the PP blog, which I've neglected for months. Technology dictated otherwise, so I'm a day late... We had the usual surge of impressive stats underlining the issues still impeding progress towards equality at work. I want to focus on just three of these. The first is the way the GPG expands hugely over the life cycle. The TUC's excellent annual report shows this so clearly: This is very familiar. But in recognising how this age profile has persisted over the years we need to remember that the qualifications profile by age has changed.…
Read More

University entrance: gender, poverty and ethnicity

In the Paula Principle book I gave only a little space to ethnic variations in the gender gap -partly because I'm no expert on ethnicity and partly because I didn't want to overload the book with figures. A recent report in The Times looks at statistics from the Department for Education on university entrance, paying particular attention to those students who were on free school meals - the standard indicator of poverty. The ethnic variations are striking; the common factor is that girls do better than boys. At one end no fewer than 75% of Chinese girls getting free school meals went to university, 10 points ahead of Chinese boys.…
Read More

Women on Boards: a classical comparison

A recent piece in Social Europe took me back to my initial education. I spent many -probably too many - years a student of Latin and Greek literature and history. Very occasionally we were asked to think about the cultural and political differences between the two supposed wellsprings of European civilisation, though at the time - we're talking several decades ago - this would generally have been seen as too broad and unmanageable a question, ie not amenable to the narrow disciplinary boundaries which operated at the time. Now along comes a study which does just that - but in relation to women's representation at board level today. Audrey Latura…
Read More

Networking: PP4 and research success

I was very intrigued by Sarah Reardon‘s piece in Nature, on now networks influence women’s success in science.  It was tweeted by Athene Donald, who knows a thing or two herself about networking and science, and whose valuable tweets I've followed for sometime . The piece is a powerful illustration of Paula Principle factor 4, the influence of vertical networks.  It took me back, almost nostalgically, to the turn of the century when with John Field and others I was directly engaged in promoting the notion of social capital as a useful tool of analysis.  The unsurprising finding is how often women working in scientific teams have found their contributions ignored or unrecognised.  The more contentious issue arising…
Read More

The GEI and a presentation puzzle

Yesterday was International Women's Day, so the airwaves were humming with news, reminders of where there has been some/no progress, encouragements and disappointments. In the spirit of international exchanges I thought I'd just focus on one source of comparative information which relates to my recurrent theme of the under-recognition of women's competences. The EU's Gender Equality Index was flagged up by Laeticia Thissen in her excellent Social Europe piece. It covers the domains you'd expect: work, money, power, health, time and knowledge, and is a trove of . The indices inevitably give only a broad and partial picture but the data provides a great platform for identifying where more needs…
Read More

Wellbeing and careers: OECD work on social performance

There's quite a debate brewing on how we should think of companies: are they purely economic entities that should not deviate from their goal of financial 'efficiency' and answer only to their shareholders (of course within legal limits); or are they social units which have a wider set of 'stakeholders' - their employees, local communities, society as a whole? I was intrigued to come across a recent OECD publication which suggests that the OECD is firmly in the latter camp. The Policy Brief based on a longer Working Paper, is on Measuring the Social Performance of Firms through the Lens of the OECD Well-being Framework, and makes a substantial contribution…
Read More

Mea culpa: how the PP neglected age

Increasingly I'm having to accept that in the Paula Principle book I left out a major angle, namely the way the PP operates over the full adult life, and not merely at work. I'm now working on a book on how to model the life course as a whole, and so have become sensitised to the way in which inequalities at work affect the (increasingly long) periods people have after they finish paid work. But I should certainly have paid it more attention when thinking then about the PP. The most recent prompt came from a piece by the FT journalist Claer Barrett. Her always interesting contributions to the weekend…
Read More

Extreme PP: the Korean case

When I wrote the PP book, now nearly five years ago, South Korea was already the extreme example of the Paula Principle. On the education side young Korean women had shot up the OECD table of tertiary level achievement; but at work their qualifications gained little recognition, and the gender pay gap remained one of the biggest. A startling article from the New York Times reports on a wave of anti-feminism. Young male Koreans are turning their anger on women, who they see as depriving them of their life chances - in spite of the evidence that in their country above almost every other young women are unable to convert…
Read More

It’s sooo slooow: IFS on closing the GPG

The Institute for Fiscal Studies is running a massive study on inequality, funded by the Nuffield Foundation under the guidance of Nobel prizewinner Angus Deaton. The review will run for some time; its scope is admirably ambitious, covering themes such as family, employment, attitudes to inequality, tax, trade and several others. It is already a huge source of policy-relevant information, and promises to be a landmark. Naturally gender figures widely in the review as a whole, and the latest report, by Alison Andrew and colleagues, deals with gender inequality at work. It is called 'The more things change the more they stay the same'. The title is suitably wry; it…
Read More

Finance Curse and Brain Drain

A couple of days ago I took part in a webinar organised by the admirable Transparency Task Force. The TTF promotes reform of our dubiously accountable finance sector. The speaker on this occasion was Nicholas Shaxson. I'd read and enjoyed his exposé of tax havens, Treasure Islands, some years ago. I'd also read and been impressed by his more recent The Finance Curse, which argues that the UK suffers from its overdeveloped finance sector just as other countries have suffered from over-reliance on a natural resource such as oil. Of course we need banks and financial institutions. They enable businesses to start up and grow, and individuals to use their…
Read More

IWD: time to restart

Yesterday was International Women's Day, and I thought this was the time to get going again on the PP blog, which I've neglected for months. Technology dictated otherwise, so I'm a day late... We had the usual surge of impressive stats underlining the issues still impeding progress towards equality at work. I want to focus on just three of these. The first is the way the GPG expands hugely over the life cycle. The TUC's excellent annual report shows this so clearly: This is very familiar. But in recognising how this age profile has persisted over the years we need to remember that the qualifications profile by age has changed.…
Read More

University entrance: gender, poverty and ethnicity

In the Paula Principle book I gave only a little space to ethnic variations in the gender gap -partly because I'm no expert on ethnicity and partly because I didn't want to overload the book with figures. A recent report in The Times looks at statistics from the Department for Education on university entrance, paying particular attention to those students who were on free school meals - the standard indicator of poverty. The ethnic variations are striking; the common factor is that girls do better than boys. At one end no fewer than 75% of Chinese girls getting free school meals went to university, 10 points ahead of Chinese boys.…
Read More

Women on Boards: a classical comparison

A recent piece in Social Europe took me back to my initial education. I spent many -probably too many - years a student of Latin and Greek literature and history. Very occasionally we were asked to think about the cultural and political differences between the two supposed wellsprings of European civilisation, though at the time - we're talking several decades ago - this would generally have been seen as too broad and unmanageable a question, ie not amenable to the narrow disciplinary boundaries which operated at the time. Now along comes a study which does just that - but in relation to women's representation at board level today. Audrey Latura…
Read More

Networking: PP4 and research success

I was very intrigued by Sarah Reardon‘s piece in Nature, on now networks influence women’s success in science.  It was tweeted by Athene Donald, who knows a thing or two herself about networking and science, and whose valuable tweets I've followed for sometime . The piece is a powerful illustration of Paula Principle factor 4, the influence of vertical networks.  It took me back, almost nostalgically, to the turn of the century when with John Field and others I was directly engaged in promoting the notion of social capital as a useful tool of analysis.  The unsurprising finding is how often women working in scientific teams have found their contributions ignored or unrecognised.  The more contentious issue arising…
Read More

The GEI and a presentation puzzle

Yesterday was International Women's Day, so the airwaves were humming with news, reminders of where there has been some/no progress, encouragements and disappointments. In the spirit of international exchanges I thought I'd just focus on one source of comparative information which relates to my recurrent theme of the under-recognition of women's competences. The EU's Gender Equality Index was flagged up by Laeticia Thissen in her excellent Social Europe piece. It covers the domains you'd expect: work, money, power, health, time and knowledge, and is a trove of . The indices inevitably give only a broad and partial picture but the data provides a great platform for identifying where more needs…
Read More

Wellbeing and careers: OECD work on social performance

There's quite a debate brewing on how we should think of companies: are they purely economic entities that should not deviate from their goal of financial 'efficiency' and answer only to their shareholders (of course within legal limits); or are they social units which have a wider set of 'stakeholders' - their employees, local communities, society as a whole? I was intrigued to come across a recent OECD publication which suggests that the OECD is firmly in the latter camp. The Policy Brief based on a longer Working Paper, is on Measuring the Social Performance of Firms through the Lens of the OECD Well-being Framework, and makes a substantial contribution…
Read More

Mea culpa: how the PP neglected age

Increasingly I'm having to accept that in the Paula Principle book I left out a major angle, namely the way the PP operates over the full adult life, and not merely at work. I'm now working on a book on how to model the life course as a whole, and so have become sensitised to the way in which inequalities at work affect the (increasingly long) periods people have after they finish paid work. But I should certainly have paid it more attention when thinking then about the PP. The most recent prompt came from a piece by the FT journalist Claer Barrett. Her always interesting contributions to the weekend…
Read More

Extreme PP: the Korean case

When I wrote the PP book, now nearly five years ago, South Korea was already the extreme example of the Paula Principle. On the education side young Korean women had shot up the OECD table of tertiary level achievement; but at work their qualifications gained little recognition, and the gender pay gap remained one of the biggest. A startling article from the New York Times reports on a wave of anti-feminism. Young male Koreans are turning their anger on women, who they see as depriving them of their life chances - in spite of the evidence that in their country above almost every other young women are unable to convert…
Read More

It’s sooo slooow: IFS on closing the GPG

The Institute for Fiscal Studies is running a massive study on inequality, funded by the Nuffield Foundation under the guidance of Nobel prizewinner Angus Deaton. The review will run for some time; its scope is admirably ambitious, covering themes such as family, employment, attitudes to inequality, tax, trade and several others. It is already a huge source of policy-relevant information, and promises to be a landmark. Naturally gender figures widely in the review as a whole, and the latest report, by Alison Andrew and colleagues, deals with gender inequality at work. It is called 'The more things change the more they stay the same'. The title is suitably wry; it…
Read More

Finance Curse and Brain Drain

A couple of days ago I took part in a webinar organised by the admirable Transparency Task Force. The TTF promotes reform of our dubiously accountable finance sector. The speaker on this occasion was Nicholas Shaxson. I'd read and enjoyed his exposé of tax havens, Treasure Islands, some years ago. I'd also read and been impressed by his more recent The Finance Curse, which argues that the UK suffers from its overdeveloped finance sector just as other countries have suffered from over-reliance on a natural resource such as oil. Of course we need banks and financial institutions. They enable businesses to start up and grow, and individuals to use their…
Read More

IWD: time to restart

Yesterday was International Women's Day, and I thought this was the time to get going again on the PP blog, which I've neglected for months. Technology dictated otherwise, so I'm a day late... We had the usual surge of impressive stats underlining the issues still impeding progress towards equality at work. I want to focus on just three of these. The first is the way the GPG expands hugely over the life cycle. The TUC's excellent annual report shows this so clearly: This is very familiar. But in recognising how this age profile has persisted over the years we need to remember that the qualifications profile by age has changed.…
Read More

University entrance: gender, poverty and ethnicity

In the Paula Principle book I gave only a little space to ethnic variations in the gender gap -partly because I'm no expert on ethnicity and partly because I didn't want to overload the book with figures. A recent report in The Times looks at statistics from the Department for Education on university entrance, paying particular attention to those students who were on free school meals - the standard indicator of poverty. The ethnic variations are striking; the common factor is that girls do better than boys. At one end no fewer than 75% of Chinese girls getting free school meals went to university, 10 points ahead of Chinese boys.…
Read More

Women on Boards: a classical comparison

A recent piece in Social Europe took me back to my initial education. I spent many -probably too many - years a student of Latin and Greek literature and history. Very occasionally we were asked to think about the cultural and political differences between the two supposed wellsprings of European civilisation, though at the time - we're talking several decades ago - this would generally have been seen as too broad and unmanageable a question, ie not amenable to the narrow disciplinary boundaries which operated at the time. Now along comes a study which does just that - but in relation to women's representation at board level today. Audrey Latura…
Read More

Networking: PP4 and research success

I was very intrigued by Sarah Reardon‘s piece in Nature, on now networks influence women’s success in science.  It was tweeted by Athene Donald, who knows a thing or two herself about networking and science, and whose valuable tweets I've followed for sometime . The piece is a powerful illustration of Paula Principle factor 4, the influence of vertical networks.  It took me back, almost nostalgically, to the turn of the century when with John Field and others I was directly engaged in promoting the notion of social capital as a useful tool of analysis.  The unsurprising finding is how often women working in scientific teams have found their contributions ignored or unrecognised.  The more contentious issue arising…
Read More

The GEI and a presentation puzzle

Yesterday was International Women's Day, so the airwaves were humming with news, reminders of where there has been some/no progress, encouragements and disappointments. In the spirit of international exchanges I thought I'd just focus on one source of comparative information which relates to my recurrent theme of the under-recognition of women's competences. The EU's Gender Equality Index was flagged up by Laeticia Thissen in her excellent Social Europe piece. It covers the domains you'd expect: work, money, power, health, time and knowledge, and is a trove of . The indices inevitably give only a broad and partial picture but the data provides a great platform for identifying where more needs…
Read More

Wellbeing and careers: OECD work on social performance

There's quite a debate brewing on how we should think of companies: are they purely economic entities that should not deviate from their goal of financial 'efficiency' and answer only to their shareholders (of course within legal limits); or are they social units which have a wider set of 'stakeholders' - their employees, local communities, society as a whole? I was intrigued to come across a recent OECD publication which suggests that the OECD is firmly in the latter camp. The Policy Brief based on a longer Working Paper, is on Measuring the Social Performance of Firms through the Lens of the OECD Well-being Framework, and makes a substantial contribution…
Read More

Mea culpa: how the PP neglected age

Increasingly I'm having to accept that in the Paula Principle book I left out a major angle, namely the way the PP operates over the full adult life, and not merely at work. I'm now working on a book on how to model the life course as a whole, and so have become sensitised to the way in which inequalities at work affect the (increasingly long) periods people have after they finish paid work. But I should certainly have paid it more attention when thinking then about the PP. The most recent prompt came from a piece by the FT journalist Claer Barrett. Her always interesting contributions to the weekend…
Read More

Extreme PP: the Korean case

When I wrote the PP book, now nearly five years ago, South Korea was already the extreme example of the Paula Principle. On the education side young Korean women had shot up the OECD table of tertiary level achievement; but at work their qualifications gained little recognition, and the gender pay gap remained one of the biggest. A startling article from the New York Times reports on a wave of anti-feminism. Young male Koreans are turning their anger on women, who they see as depriving them of their life chances - in spite of the evidence that in their country above almost every other young women are unable to convert…
Read More

It’s sooo slooow: IFS on closing the GPG

The Institute for Fiscal Studies is running a massive study on inequality, funded by the Nuffield Foundation under the guidance of Nobel prizewinner Angus Deaton. The review will run for some time; its scope is admirably ambitious, covering themes such as family, employment, attitudes to inequality, tax, trade and several others. It is already a huge source of policy-relevant information, and promises to be a landmark. Naturally gender figures widely in the review as a whole, and the latest report, by Alison Andrew and colleagues, deals with gender inequality at work. It is called 'The more things change the more they stay the same'. The title is suitably wry; it…
Read More

Finance Curse and Brain Drain

A couple of days ago I took part in a webinar organised by the admirable Transparency Task Force. The TTF promotes reform of our dubiously accountable finance sector. The speaker on this occasion was Nicholas Shaxson. I'd read and enjoyed his exposé of tax havens, Treasure Islands, some years ago. I'd also read and been impressed by his more recent The Finance Curse, which argues that the UK suffers from its overdeveloped finance sector just as other countries have suffered from over-reliance on a natural resource such as oil. Of course we need banks and financial institutions. They enable businesses to start up and grow, and individuals to use their…
Read More

IWD: time to restart

Yesterday was International Women's Day, and I thought this was the time to get going again on the PP blog, which I've neglected for months. Technology dictated otherwise, so I'm a day late... We had the usual surge of impressive stats underlining the issues still impeding progress towards equality at work. I want to focus on just three of these. The first is the way the GPG expands hugely over the life cycle. The TUC's excellent annual report shows this so clearly: This is very familiar. But in recognising how this age profile has persisted over the years we need to remember that the qualifications profile by age has changed.…
Read More

University entrance: gender, poverty and ethnicity

In the Paula Principle book I gave only a little space to ethnic variations in the gender gap -partly because I'm no expert on ethnicity and partly because I didn't want to overload the book with figures. A recent report in The Times looks at statistics from the Department for Education on university entrance, paying particular attention to those students who were on free school meals - the standard indicator of poverty. The ethnic variations are striking; the common factor is that girls do better than boys. At one end no fewer than 75% of Chinese girls getting free school meals went to university, 10 points ahead of Chinese boys.…
Read More

Women on Boards: a classical comparison

A recent piece in Social Europe took me back to my initial education. I spent many -probably too many - years a student of Latin and Greek literature and history. Very occasionally we were asked to think about the cultural and political differences between the two supposed wellsprings of European civilisation, though at the time - we're talking several decades ago - this would generally have been seen as too broad and unmanageable a question, ie not amenable to the narrow disciplinary boundaries which operated at the time. Now along comes a study which does just that - but in relation to women's representation at board level today. Audrey Latura…
Read More

Networking: PP4 and research success

I was very intrigued by Sarah Reardon‘s piece in Nature, on now networks influence women’s success in science.  It was tweeted by Athene Donald, who knows a thing or two herself about networking and science, and whose valuable tweets I've followed for sometime . The piece is a powerful illustration of Paula Principle factor 4, the influence of vertical networks.  It took me back, almost nostalgically, to the turn of the century when with John Field and others I was directly engaged in promoting the notion of social capital as a useful tool of analysis.  The unsurprising finding is how often women working in scientific teams have found their contributions ignored or unrecognised.  The more contentious issue arising…
Read More

The GEI and a presentation puzzle

Yesterday was International Women's Day, so the airwaves were humming with news, reminders of where there has been some/no progress, encouragements and disappointments. In the spirit of international exchanges I thought I'd just focus on one source of comparative information which relates to my recurrent theme of the under-recognition of women's competences. The EU's Gender Equality Index was flagged up by Laeticia Thissen in her excellent Social Europe piece. It covers the domains you'd expect: work, money, power, health, time and knowledge, and is a trove of . The indices inevitably give only a broad and partial picture but the data provides a great platform for identifying where more needs…
Read More

Wellbeing and careers: OECD work on social performance

There's quite a debate brewing on how we should think of companies: are they purely economic entities that should not deviate from their goal of financial 'efficiency' and answer only to their shareholders (of course within legal limits); or are they social units which have a wider set of 'stakeholders' - their employees, local communities, society as a whole? I was intrigued to come across a recent OECD publication which suggests that the OECD is firmly in the latter camp. The Policy Brief based on a longer Working Paper, is on Measuring the Social Performance of Firms through the Lens of the OECD Well-being Framework, and makes a substantial contribution…
Read More

Mea culpa: how the PP neglected age

Increasingly I'm having to accept that in the Paula Principle book I left out a major angle, namely the way the PP operates over the full adult life, and not merely at work. I'm now working on a book on how to model the life course as a whole, and so have become sensitised to the way in which inequalities at work affect the (increasingly long) periods people have after they finish paid work. But I should certainly have paid it more attention when thinking then about the PP. The most recent prompt came from a piece by the FT journalist Claer Barrett. Her always interesting contributions to the weekend…
Read More

Extreme PP: the Korean case

When I wrote the PP book, now nearly five years ago, South Korea was already the extreme example of the Paula Principle. On the education side young Korean women had shot up the OECD table of tertiary level achievement; but at work their qualifications gained little recognition, and the gender pay gap remained one of the biggest. A startling article from the New York Times reports on a wave of anti-feminism. Young male Koreans are turning their anger on women, who they see as depriving them of their life chances - in spite of the evidence that in their country above almost every other young women are unable to convert…
Read More

It’s sooo slooow: IFS on closing the GPG

The Institute for Fiscal Studies is running a massive study on inequality, funded by the Nuffield Foundation under the guidance of Nobel prizewinner Angus Deaton. The review will run for some time; its scope is admirably ambitious, covering themes such as family, employment, attitudes to inequality, tax, trade and several others. It is already a huge source of policy-relevant information, and promises to be a landmark. Naturally gender figures widely in the review as a whole, and the latest report, by Alison Andrew and colleagues, deals with gender inequality at work. It is called 'The more things change the more they stay the same'. The title is suitably wry; it…
Read More

Finance Curse and Brain Drain

A couple of days ago I took part in a webinar organised by the admirable Transparency Task Force. The TTF promotes reform of our dubiously accountable finance sector. The speaker on this occasion was Nicholas Shaxson. I'd read and enjoyed his exposé of tax havens, Treasure Islands, some years ago. I'd also read and been impressed by his more recent The Finance Curse, which argues that the UK suffers from its overdeveloped finance sector just as other countries have suffered from over-reliance on a natural resource such as oil. Of course we need banks and financial institutions. They enable businesses to start up and grow, and individuals to use their…
Read More

IWD: time to restart

Yesterday was International Women's Day, and I thought this was the time to get going again on the PP blog, which I've neglected for months. Technology dictated otherwise, so I'm a day late... We had the usual surge of impressive stats underlining the issues still impeding progress towards equality at work. I want to focus on just three of these. The first is the way the GPG expands hugely over the life cycle. The TUC's excellent annual report shows this so clearly: This is very familiar. But in recognising how this age profile has persisted over the years we need to remember that the qualifications profile by age has changed.…
Read More

University entrance: gender, poverty and ethnicity

In the Paula Principle book I gave only a little space to ethnic variations in the gender gap -partly because I'm no expert on ethnicity and partly because I didn't want to overload the book with figures. A recent report in The Times looks at statistics from the Department for Education on university entrance, paying particular attention to those students who were on free school meals - the standard indicator of poverty. The ethnic variations are striking; the common factor is that girls do better than boys. At one end no fewer than 75% of Chinese girls getting free school meals went to university, 10 points ahead of Chinese boys.…
Read More

Women on Boards: a classical comparison

A recent piece in Social Europe took me back to my initial education. I spent many -probably too many - years a student of Latin and Greek literature and history. Very occasionally we were asked to think about the cultural and political differences between the two supposed wellsprings of European civilisation, though at the time - we're talking several decades ago - this would generally have been seen as too broad and unmanageable a question, ie not amenable to the narrow disciplinary boundaries which operated at the time. Now along comes a study which does just that - but in relation to women's representation at board level today. Audrey Latura…
Read More

Networking: PP4 and research success

I was very intrigued by Sarah Reardon‘s piece in Nature, on now networks influence women’s success in science.  It was tweeted by Athene Donald, who knows a thing or two herself about networking and science, and whose valuable tweets I've followed for sometime . The piece is a powerful illustration of Paula Principle factor 4, the influence of vertical networks.  It took me back, almost nostalgically, to the turn of the century when with John Field and others I was directly engaged in promoting the notion of social capital as a useful tool of analysis.  The unsurprising finding is how often women working in scientific teams have found their contributions ignored or unrecognised.  The more contentious issue arising…
Read More

The GEI and a presentation puzzle

Yesterday was International Women's Day, so the airwaves were humming with news, reminders of where there has been some/no progress, encouragements and disappointments. In the spirit of international exchanges I thought I'd just focus on one source of comparative information which relates to my recurrent theme of the under-recognition of women's competences. The EU's Gender Equality Index was flagged up by Laeticia Thissen in her excellent Social Europe piece. It covers the domains you'd expect: work, money, power, health, time and knowledge, and is a trove of . The indices inevitably give only a broad and partial picture but the data provides a great platform for identifying where more needs…
Read More

Wellbeing and careers: OECD work on social performance

There's quite a debate brewing on how we should think of companies: are they purely economic entities that should not deviate from their goal of financial 'efficiency' and answer only to their shareholders (of course within legal limits); or are they social units which have a wider set of 'stakeholders' - their employees, local communities, society as a whole? I was intrigued to come across a recent OECD publication which suggests that the OECD is firmly in the latter camp. The Policy Brief based on a longer Working Paper, is on Measuring the Social Performance of Firms through the Lens of the OECD Well-being Framework, and makes a substantial contribution…
Read More

Mea culpa: how the PP neglected age

Increasingly I'm having to accept that in the Paula Principle book I left out a major angle, namely the way the PP operates over the full adult life, and not merely at work. I'm now working on a book on how to model the life course as a whole, and so have become sensitised to the way in which inequalities at work affect the (increasingly long) periods people have after they finish paid work. But I should certainly have paid it more attention when thinking then about the PP. The most recent prompt came from a piece by the FT journalist Claer Barrett. Her always interesting contributions to the weekend…
Read More

Extreme PP: the Korean case

When I wrote the PP book, now nearly five years ago, South Korea was already the extreme example of the Paula Principle. On the education side young Korean women had shot up the OECD table of tertiary level achievement; but at work their qualifications gained little recognition, and the gender pay gap remained one of the biggest. A startling article from the New York Times reports on a wave of anti-feminism. Young male Koreans are turning their anger on women, who they see as depriving them of their life chances - in spite of the evidence that in their country above almost every other young women are unable to convert…
Read More

It’s sooo slooow: IFS on closing the GPG

The Institute for Fiscal Studies is running a massive study on inequality, funded by the Nuffield Foundation under the guidance of Nobel prizewinner Angus Deaton. The review will run for some time; its scope is admirably ambitious, covering themes such as family, employment, attitudes to inequality, tax, trade and several others. It is already a huge source of policy-relevant information, and promises to be a landmark. Naturally gender figures widely in the review as a whole, and the latest report, by Alison Andrew and colleagues, deals with gender inequality at work. It is called 'The more things change the more they stay the same'. The title is suitably wry; it…
Read More

Finance Curse and Brain Drain

A couple of days ago I took part in a webinar organised by the admirable Transparency Task Force. The TTF promotes reform of our dubiously accountable finance sector. The speaker on this occasion was Nicholas Shaxson. I'd read and enjoyed his exposé of tax havens, Treasure Islands, some years ago. I'd also read and been impressed by his more recent The Finance Curse, which argues that the UK suffers from its overdeveloped finance sector just as other countries have suffered from over-reliance on a natural resource such as oil. Of course we need banks and financial institutions. They enable businesses to start up and grow, and individuals to use their…
Read More

IWD: time to restart

Yesterday was International Women's Day, and I thought this was the time to get going again on the PP blog, which I've neglected for months. Technology dictated otherwise, so I'm a day late... We had the usual surge of impressive stats underlining the issues still impeding progress towards equality at work. I want to focus on just three of these. The first is the way the GPG expands hugely over the life cycle. The TUC's excellent annual report shows this so clearly: This is very familiar. But in recognising how this age profile has persisted over the years we need to remember that the qualifications profile by age has changed.…
Read More

University entrance: gender, poverty and ethnicity

In the Paula Principle book I gave only a little space to ethnic variations in the gender gap -partly because I'm no expert on ethnicity and partly because I didn't want to overload the book with figures. A recent report in The Times looks at statistics from the Department for Education on university entrance, paying particular attention to those students who were on free school meals - the standard indicator of poverty. The ethnic variations are striking; the common factor is that girls do better than boys. At one end no fewer than 75% of Chinese girls getting free school meals went to university, 10 points ahead of Chinese boys.…
Read More

Women on Boards: a classical comparison

A recent piece in Social Europe took me back to my initial education. I spent many -probably too many - years a student of Latin and Greek literature and history. Very occasionally we were asked to think about the cultural and political differences between the two supposed wellsprings of European civilisation, though at the time - we're talking several decades ago - this would generally have been seen as too broad and unmanageable a question, ie not amenable to the narrow disciplinary boundaries which operated at the time. Now along comes a study which does just that - but in relation to women's representation at board level today. Audrey Latura…
Read More

Networking: PP4 and research success

I was very intrigued by Sarah Reardon‘s piece in Nature, on now networks influence women’s success in science.  It was tweeted by Athene Donald, who knows a thing or two herself about networking and science, and whose valuable tweets I've followed for sometime . The piece is a powerful illustration of Paula Principle factor 4, the influence of vertical networks.  It took me back, almost nostalgically, to the turn of the century when with John Field and others I was directly engaged in promoting the notion of social capital as a useful tool of analysis.  The unsurprising finding is how often women working in scientific teams have found their contributions ignored or unrecognised.  The more contentious issue arising…
Read More

The GEI and a presentation puzzle

Yesterday was International Women's Day, so the airwaves were humming with news, reminders of where there has been some/no progress, encouragements and disappointments. In the spirit of international exchanges I thought I'd just focus on one source of comparative information which relates to my recurrent theme of the under-recognition of women's competences. The EU's Gender Equality Index was flagged up by Laeticia Thissen in her excellent Social Europe piece. It covers the domains you'd expect: work, money, power, health, time and knowledge, and is a trove of . The indices inevitably give only a broad and partial picture but the data provides a great platform for identifying where more needs…
Read More

Wellbeing and careers: OECD work on social performance

There's quite a debate brewing on how we should think of companies: are they purely economic entities that should not deviate from their goal of financial 'efficiency' and answer only to their shareholders (of course within legal limits); or are they social units which have a wider set of 'stakeholders' - their employees, local communities, society as a whole? I was intrigued to come across a recent OECD publication which suggests that the OECD is firmly in the latter camp. The Policy Brief based on a longer Working Paper, is on Measuring the Social Performance of Firms through the Lens of the OECD Well-being Framework, and makes a substantial contribution…
Read More

Mea culpa: how the PP neglected age

Increasingly I'm having to accept that in the Paula Principle book I left out a major angle, namely the way the PP operates over the full adult life, and not merely at work. I'm now working on a book on how to model the life course as a whole, and so have become sensitised to the way in which inequalities at work affect the (increasingly long) periods people have after they finish paid work. But I should certainly have paid it more attention when thinking then about the PP. The most recent prompt came from a piece by the FT journalist Claer Barrett. Her always interesting contributions to the weekend…
Read More

Extreme PP: the Korean case

When I wrote the PP book, now nearly five years ago, South Korea was already the extreme example of the Paula Principle. On the education side young Korean women had shot up the OECD table of tertiary level achievement; but at work their qualifications gained little recognition, and the gender pay gap remained one of the biggest. A startling article from the New York Times reports on a wave of anti-feminism. Young male Koreans are turning their anger on women, who they see as depriving them of their life chances - in spite of the evidence that in their country above almost every other young women are unable to convert…
Read More

It’s sooo slooow: IFS on closing the GPG

The Institute for Fiscal Studies is running a massive study on inequality, funded by the Nuffield Foundation under the guidance of Nobel prizewinner Angus Deaton. The review will run for some time; its scope is admirably ambitious, covering themes such as family, employment, attitudes to inequality, tax, trade and several others. It is already a huge source of policy-relevant information, and promises to be a landmark. Naturally gender figures widely in the review as a whole, and the latest report, by Alison Andrew and colleagues, deals with gender inequality at work. It is called 'The more things change the more they stay the same'. The title is suitably wry; it…
Read More

Finance Curse and Brain Drain

A couple of days ago I took part in a webinar organised by the admirable Transparency Task Force. The TTF promotes reform of our dubiously accountable finance sector. The speaker on this occasion was Nicholas Shaxson. I'd read and enjoyed his exposé of tax havens, Treasure Islands, some years ago. I'd also read and been impressed by his more recent The Finance Curse, which argues that the UK suffers from its overdeveloped finance sector just as other countries have suffered from over-reliance on a natural resource such as oil. Of course we need banks and financial institutions. They enable businesses to start up and grow, and individuals to use their…
Read More

IWD: time to restart

Yesterday was International Women's Day, and I thought this was the time to get going again on the PP blog, which I've neglected for months. Technology dictated otherwise, so I'm a day late... We had the usual surge of impressive stats underlining the issues still impeding progress towards equality at work. I want to focus on just three of these. The first is the way the GPG expands hugely over the life cycle. The TUC's excellent annual report shows this so clearly: This is very familiar. But in recognising how this age profile has persisted over the years we need to remember that the qualifications profile by age has changed.…
Read More

University entrance: gender, poverty and ethnicity

In the Paula Principle book I gave only a little space to ethnic variations in the gender gap -partly because I'm no expert on ethnicity and partly because I didn't want to overload the book with figures. A recent report in The Times looks at statistics from the Department for Education on university entrance, paying particular attention to those students who were on free school meals - the standard indicator of poverty. The ethnic variations are striking; the common factor is that girls do better than boys. At one end no fewer than 75% of Chinese girls getting free school meals went to university, 10 points ahead of Chinese boys.…
Read More

Women on Boards: a classical comparison

A recent piece in Social Europe took me back to my initial education. I spent many -probably too many - years a student of Latin and Greek literature and history. Very occasionally we were asked to think about the cultural and political differences between the two supposed wellsprings of European civilisation, though at the time - we're talking several decades ago - this would generally have been seen as too broad and unmanageable a question, ie not amenable to the narrow disciplinary boundaries which operated at the time. Now along comes a study which does just that - but in relation to women's representation at board level today. Audrey Latura…
Read More

Networking: PP4 and research success

I was very intrigued by Sarah Reardon‘s piece in Nature, on now networks influence women’s success in science.  It was tweeted by Athene Donald, who knows a thing or two herself about networking and science, and whose valuable tweets I've followed for sometime . The piece is a powerful illustration of Paula Principle factor 4, the influence of vertical networks.  It took me back, almost nostalgically, to the turn of the century when with John Field and others I was directly engaged in promoting the notion of social capital as a useful tool of analysis.  The unsurprising finding is how often women working in scientific teams have found their contributions ignored or unrecognised.  The more contentious issue arising…
Read More

The GEI and a presentation puzzle

Yesterday was International Women's Day, so the airwaves were humming with news, reminders of where there has been some/no progress, encouragements and disappointments. In the spirit of international exchanges I thought I'd just focus on one source of comparative information which relates to my recurrent theme of the under-recognition of women's competences. The EU's Gender Equality Index was flagged up by Laeticia Thissen in her excellent Social Europe piece. It covers the domains you'd expect: work, money, power, health, time and knowledge, and is a trove of . The indices inevitably give only a broad and partial picture but the data provides a great platform for identifying where more needs…
Read More

Wellbeing and careers: OECD work on social performance

There's quite a debate brewing on how we should think of companies: are they purely economic entities that should not deviate from their goal of financial 'efficiency' and answer only to their shareholders (of course within legal limits); or are they social units which have a wider set of 'stakeholders' - their employees, local communities, society as a whole? I was intrigued to come across a recent OECD publication which suggests that the OECD is firmly in the latter camp. The Policy Brief based on a longer Working Paper, is on Measuring the Social Performance of Firms through the Lens of the OECD Well-being Framework, and makes a substantial contribution…
Read More

Mea culpa: how the PP neglected age

Increasingly I'm having to accept that in the Paula Principle book I left out a major angle, namely the way the PP operates over the full adult life, and not merely at work. I'm now working on a book on how to model the life course as a whole, and so have become sensitised to the way in which inequalities at work affect the (increasingly long) periods people have after they finish paid work. But I should certainly have paid it more attention when thinking then about the PP. The most recent prompt came from a piece by the FT journalist Claer Barrett. Her always interesting contributions to the weekend…
Read More

Extreme PP: the Korean case

When I wrote the PP book, now nearly five years ago, South Korea was already the extreme example of the Paula Principle. On the education side young Korean women had shot up the OECD table of tertiary level achievement; but at work their qualifications gained little recognition, and the gender pay gap remained one of the biggest. A startling article from the New York Times reports on a wave of anti-feminism. Young male Koreans are turning their anger on women, who they see as depriving them of their life chances - in spite of the evidence that in their country above almost every other young women are unable to convert…
Read More

It’s sooo slooow: IFS on closing the GPG

The Institute for Fiscal Studies is running a massive study on inequality, funded by the Nuffield Foundation under the guidance of Nobel prizewinner Angus Deaton. The review will run for some time; its scope is admirably ambitious, covering themes such as family, employment, attitudes to inequality, tax, trade and several others. It is already a huge source of policy-relevant information, and promises to be a landmark. Naturally gender figures widely in the review as a whole, and the latest report, by Alison Andrew and colleagues, deals with gender inequality at work. It is called 'The more things change the more they stay the same'. The title is suitably wry; it…
Read More

Finance Curse and Brain Drain

A couple of days ago I took part in a webinar organised by the admirable Transparency Task Force. The TTF promotes reform of our dubiously accountable finance sector. The speaker on this occasion was Nicholas Shaxson. I'd read and enjoyed his exposé of tax havens, Treasure Islands, some years ago. I'd also read and been impressed by his more recent The Finance Curse, which argues that the UK suffers from its overdeveloped finance sector just as other countries have suffered from over-reliance on a natural resource such as oil. Of course we need banks and financial institutions. They enable businesses to start up and grow, and individuals to use their…
Read More

IWD: time to restart

Yesterday was International Women's Day, and I thought this was the time to get going again on the PP blog, which I've neglected for months. Technology dictated otherwise, so I'm a day late... We had the usual surge of impressive stats underlining the issues still impeding progress towards equality at work. I want to focus on just three of these. The first is the way the GPG expands hugely over the life cycle. The TUC's excellent annual report shows this so clearly: This is very familiar. But in recognising how this age profile has persisted over the years we need to remember that the qualifications profile by age has changed.…
Read More

University entrance: gender, poverty and ethnicity

In the Paula Principle book I gave only a little space to ethnic variations in the gender gap -partly because I'm no expert on ethnicity and partly because I didn't want to overload the book with figures. A recent report in The Times looks at statistics from the Department for Education on university entrance, paying particular attention to those students who were on free school meals - the standard indicator of poverty. The ethnic variations are striking; the common factor is that girls do better than boys. At one end no fewer than 75% of Chinese girls getting free school meals went to university, 10 points ahead of Chinese boys.…
Read More

Women on Boards: a classical comparison

A recent piece in Social Europe took me back to my initial education. I spent many -probably too many - years a student of Latin and Greek literature and history. Very occasionally we were asked to think about the cultural and political differences between the two supposed wellsprings of European civilisation, though at the time - we're talking several decades ago - this would generally have been seen as too broad and unmanageable a question, ie not amenable to the narrow disciplinary boundaries which operated at the time. Now along comes a study which does just that - but in relation to women's representation at board level today. Audrey Latura…
Read More

Networking: PP4 and research success

I was very intrigued by Sarah Reardon‘s piece in Nature, on now networks influence women’s success in science.  It was tweeted by Athene Donald, who knows a thing or two herself about networking and science, and whose valuable tweets I've followed for sometime . The piece is a powerful illustration of Paula Principle factor 4, the influence of vertical networks.  It took me back, almost nostalgically, to the turn of the century when with John Field and others I was directly engaged in promoting the notion of social capital as a useful tool of analysis.  The unsurprising finding is how often women working in scientific teams have found their contributions ignored or unrecognised.  The more contentious issue arising…
Read More

The GEI and a presentation puzzle

Yesterday was International Women's Day, so the airwaves were humming with news, reminders of where there has been some/no progress, encouragements and disappointments. In the spirit of international exchanges I thought I'd just focus on one source of comparative information which relates to my recurrent theme of the under-recognition of women's competences. The EU's Gender Equality Index was flagged up by Laeticia Thissen in her excellent Social Europe piece. It covers the domains you'd expect: work, money, power, health, time and knowledge, and is a trove of . The indices inevitably give only a broad and partial picture but the data provides a great platform for identifying where more needs…
Read More

Wellbeing and careers: OECD work on social performance

There's quite a debate brewing on how we should think of companies: are they purely economic entities that should not deviate from their goal of financial 'efficiency' and answer only to their shareholders (of course within legal limits); or are they social units which have a wider set of 'stakeholders' - their employees, local communities, society as a whole? I was intrigued to come across a recent OECD publication which suggests that the OECD is firmly in the latter camp. The Policy Brief based on a longer Working Paper, is on Measuring the Social Performance of Firms through the Lens of the OECD Well-being Framework, and makes a substantial contribution…
Read More

Mea culpa: how the PP neglected age

Increasingly I'm having to accept that in the Paula Principle book I left out a major angle, namely the way the PP operates over the full adult life, and not merely at work. I'm now working on a book on how to model the life course as a whole, and so have become sensitised to the way in which inequalities at work affect the (increasingly long) periods people have after they finish paid work. But I should certainly have paid it more attention when thinking then about the PP. The most recent prompt came from a piece by the FT journalist Claer Barrett. Her always interesting contributions to the weekend…
Read More

Extreme PP: the Korean case

When I wrote the PP book, now nearly five years ago, South Korea was already the extreme example of the Paula Principle. On the education side young Korean women had shot up the OECD table of tertiary level achievement; but at work their qualifications gained little recognition, and the gender pay gap remained one of the biggest. A startling article from the New York Times reports on a wave of anti-feminism. Young male Koreans are turning their anger on women, who they see as depriving them of their life chances - in spite of the evidence that in their country above almost every other young women are unable to convert…
Read More

It’s sooo slooow: IFS on closing the GPG

The Institute for Fiscal Studies is running a massive study on inequality, funded by the Nuffield Foundation under the guidance of Nobel prizewinner Angus Deaton. The review will run for some time; its scope is admirably ambitious, covering themes such as family, employment, attitudes to inequality, tax, trade and several others. It is already a huge source of policy-relevant information, and promises to be a landmark. Naturally gender figures widely in the review as a whole, and the latest report, by Alison Andrew and colleagues, deals with gender inequality at work. It is called 'The more things change the more they stay the same'. The title is suitably wry; it…
Read More